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Latin question?

Latin question? Topic: German dative case sentences with adverbs
June 25, 2019 / By Minty
Question: Salve, meus nomen est, Lauren. Luke nili non putare iste posse lonquor Latinus. Meus lonquor complevi Latinus. Does the above say... Hello, my name is Lauren. Luke does not believe that I can speak Latin. I speak perfect Latin. Is this correct? How do you pronounce it?
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Best Answers: Latin question?

Lillia Lillia | 2 days ago
Well, I think poor old Luke is right! Whoever produced this sentences clearly can't speak Latin! Is this the output of one of those good for nothing automatic translator? Because the second sentence is completely WRONG!!!! The words choice may be good, but you need a certain form (that is, correct endings for each of the cases, moods, tenses, persons etc) for nouns and verbs in order to have a grammatical sentence. The correct Latin translation would be: "Luke non putat me posse Latine loqui. Optime Latine loquor." Note that in the last part I translated both "perfect" and "Latin" with adverbs. ("Optime" means "very well", that's how a Roman would have said it). As fot the first sentence, you can leave it this way, but a better option would be: "Salve, mihi nomen est Lauren". (Dative case for the person who has the name) I'm not a native English speaker, but I guess the pronunciations suggested by the other contributors are correct. Pronunciation is a matter of dispute among scholars, and some time ago the Latin spoken by a German-speaking person would have been extremely different from the one of an Italian or French. Recently there has been an agreement of a conventional pronunciation which is said to be faithful to the way Classical-era Romans used to speak... But the truth is we can't be sure...
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Lillia Originally Answered: Latin question?
Well, I think poor old Luke is right! Whoever produced this sentences clearly can't speak Latin! Is this the output of one of those good for nothing automatic translator? Because the second sentence is completely WRONG!!!! The words choice may be good, but you need a certain form (that is, correct endings for each of the cases, moods, tenses, persons etc) for nouns and verbs in order to have a grammatical sentence. The correct Latin translation would be: "Luke non putat me posse Latine loqui. Optime Latine loquor." Note that in the last part I translated both "perfect" and "Latin" with adverbs. ("Optime" means "very well", that's how a Roman would have said it). As fot the first sentence, you can leave it this way, but a better option would be: "Salve, mihi nomen est Lauren". (Dative case for the person who has the name) I'm not a native English speaker, but I guess the pronunciations suggested by the other contributors are correct. Pronunciation is a matter of dispute among scholars, and some time ago the Latin spoken by a German-speaking person would have been extremely different from the one of an Italian or French. Recently there has been an agreement of a conventional pronunciation which is said to be faithful to the way Classical-era Romans used to speak... But the truth is we can't be sure...
Lillia Originally Answered: Latin question?
The first sentence looks correct. The second one could be correct, but it's been a lot of years since I took Latin. As to how to pronounce it, that depends. My Latin teacher insisted that we pronounce V as a W, but not everybody does that. So the first sentence would be: Sal-way, me-us gnome-en est Lauren.

Kae Kae
The first sentence looks correct. The second one could be correct, but it's been a lot of years since I took Latin. As to how to pronounce it, that depends. My Latin teacher insisted that we pronounce V as a W, but not everybody does that. So the first sentence would be: Sal-way, me-us gnome-en est Lauren.
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Gussie Gussie
Very good. That is correct. You would pronounce it: S-all-way, may-us no-men est Lauren Luke nill-ee no-n poot-are-ai is-t poe-say lawn-core Lateen-us. May-us lawn-core com-ple-wee Lateen-us.
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Gussie Originally Answered: Latin Adjective Help?
predicative adjectives are when you use a form of esse to attach an adjective to a subject. ex. Femina bella est. The woman is pretty. Bella is a predicative adjective there because it is part of the predicate of that sentence. The adjective must be in the nominative in this situation. Attributive is when the adjective is not joined to the word it describes. Feminam bellam video. I see a pretty woman. Femina bella in via ambulat. A pretty woman is walking int the street. For attributive adjectives, the adjective can be in any case. Substantive adjectives are not attached to other word and function as nouns. Bella est bona. - Beauty is good. For the substantive sense, we are just treating the adjective as a noun. I'm not really sure about the last bit, it's been years since I've studied any Latin.

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