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Identity stolen while I was a minor (under 18)?

Identity stolen while I was a minor (under 18)? Topic: Data step case statement
June 17, 2019 / By Jethro
Question: So I just found out my Identity was stolen in May 2007. They opened a paypal account and scammed eBay Buyers. When I tried opening a Paypal account I was notified that the account I had (better yet someone else had in my name) had a negative balance of 3,000…… I am currently 19 years old in May 2007 I was only 17 (still a minor). Am I responsible for this debt??? The used my Social Security number and even DOB (i think)
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Best Answers: Identity stolen while I was a minor (under 18)?

Godfrey Godfrey | 7 days ago
I'm going to take Mr. Quizzard's answer a step or two further: FIRST: Go to the hospital where you were born, go to the hospital records, and find out if they have a copy of your birth records that has your baby handprints and footprints on it. The ID thief can't possibly steal your fingerprints and footprints! Get a very clean copy of that birth record and have at least 2 copies in case one gets damaged or lost. Next, go in person to your county building and get a copy of your birth certificate. Then go in person to the Social Security Administration and get a copy of the signed and dated application for your Social Security number to prove that your Social Security number was assigned to you. Now go to the police station and get yourself fingerprinted twice - one for their files and one for a copy for your own files. Next, go to your school administration office from high school and junior high and ask for copies of your school files which include all paperwork mailed to you or your parents in order to prove that you lived at your parents' residence for more than 5 years, and including the time the thief created the acoount using your name. Next, take a witness with you and go to a certified Notary Public. In your handwriting, swear in front of a witness that you are who you claim to be, that the above documents and your signature are yours, and sign the paper 5 times. Make 2 copies of each document, including your signed and witnessed statement, and get the copies notarized. Make sure you put on your paperwork the notarization number in case a court needs to subpoena this transaction. Make a printout of the notification from Paypal, including the date and time the email was sent to you. Then ask Paypal under the Freedom of Information Act for the date and time the account was created. If this is supposedly you who made that account, then you are entitled under the Freedom of Information Act to any documentation or data information with your name and Social Security number. If they refuse in an e-mail, find out a phone number for a human being at Paypal and talk to a human being over the phone, and again demand all data and documentation in your name, social security number, and date of birth and demand a statement of all account activity be sent to you. Be sure and record that conversation, noting the date and exact time you made that phone call. Be sure and get that human being's name at Paypal, and record that name as well. If they again refuse to give you a copy of the data in your name, take a copy of that phone conversation plus all the copies of the notarized documents to a lawyer (NEVER HAND OVER ANY ORIGINALS UNTIL YOU ARE OFFICIALLY SUBPEONAED TO DO SO IN A COURT OF LAW.) You have the right to file a lawsuit against Paypal if they deny you access to your own information that includes your Social Security Number and DOB. You have a right to sue Paypal for allowing a minor to open an account without actual or physical proof or signed paperwork of parental or legal guardian's permission. You have a right to sue for damages that include your legal fees. Make sure you get ALL of the above legal documents, make sure you have 2 copies of each, and make sure you printout or get at least 2 copies of each and every communication from Paypal. Then take all of this information to a lawyer who specializes in ID theft. You may have to pay for some detective work, including finding out the real identity of the thief by physically going to the address they used and getting a picture and a name of the person residing there. But you clearly have a case. Make sure you get those copies of those documents - and remember, Judge Judy awards in favor of clear and complete documentation every time.
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Godfrey Originally Answered: Identity stolen while I was a minor (under 18)?
I'm going to take Mr. Quizzard's answer a step or two further: FIRST: Go to the hospital where you were born, go to the hospital records, and find out if they have a copy of your birth records that has your baby handprints and footprints on it. The ID thief can't possibly steal your fingerprints and footprints! Get a very clean copy of that birth record and have at least 2 copies in case one gets damaged or lost. Next, go in person to your county building and get a copy of your birth certificate. Then go in person to the Social Security Administration and get a copy of the signed and dated application for your Social Security number to prove that your Social Security number was assigned to you. Now go to the police station and get yourself fingerprinted twice - one for their files and one for a copy for your own files. Next, go to your school administration office from high school and junior high and ask for copies of your school files which include all paperwork mailed to you or your parents in order to prove that you lived at your parents' residence for more than 5 years, and including the time the thief created the acoount using your name. Next, take a witness with you and go to a certified Notary Public. In your handwriting, swear in front of a witness that you are who you claim to be, that the above documents and your signature are yours, and sign the paper 5 times. Make 2 copies of each document, including your signed and witnessed statement, and get the copies notarized. Make sure you put on your paperwork the notarization number in case a court needs to subpoena this transaction. Make a printout of the notification from Paypal, including the date and time the email was sent to you. Then ask Paypal under the Freedom of Information Act for the date and time the account was created. If this is supposedly you who made that account, then you are entitled under the Freedom of Information Act to any documentation or data information with your name and Social Security number. If they refuse in an e-mail, find out a phone number for a human being at Paypal and talk to a human being over the phone, and again demand all data and documentation in your name, social security number, and date of birth and demand a statement of all account activity be sent to you. Be sure and record that conversation, noting the date and exact time you made that phone call. Be sure and get that human being's name at Paypal, and record that name as well. If they again refuse to give you a copy of the data in your name, take a copy of that phone conversation plus all the copies of the notarized documents to a lawyer (NEVER HAND OVER ANY ORIGINALS UNTIL YOU ARE OFFICIALLY SUBPEONAED TO DO SO IN A COURT OF LAW.) You have the right to file a lawsuit against Paypal if they deny you access to your own information that includes your Social Security Number and DOB. You have a right to sue Paypal for allowing a minor to open an account without actual or physical proof or signed paperwork of parental or legal guardian's permission. You have a right to sue for damages that include your legal fees. Make sure you get ALL of the above legal documents, make sure you have 2 copies of each, and make sure you printout or get at least 2 copies of each and every communication from Paypal. Then take all of this information to a lawyer who specializes in ID theft. You may have to pay for some detective work, including finding out the real identity of the thief by physically going to the address they used and getting a picture and a name of the person residing there. But you clearly have a case. Make sure you get those copies of those documents - and remember, Judge Judy awards in favor of clear and complete documentation every time.
Godfrey Originally Answered: Identity stolen while I was a minor (under 18)?
I find this odd. If you were a minor, and someone stole your ID, they would have been creating a Paypal account as a minor, something that isn't allowed. So to create an account, while they may have used your NAME, they did not use the rest of your ID, but must have used some bogus ID identifying you as an adult. Contact Paypal and give them your correct ID, including your proper birthdate. At that point, they ought to accept that you are not the person on the account.

Drake Drake
I find this odd. If you were a minor, and someone stole your ID, they would have been creating a Paypal account as a minor, something that isn't allowed. So to create an account, while they may have used your NAME, they did not use the rest of your ID, but must have used some bogus ID identifying you as an adult. Contact Paypal and give them your correct ID, including your proper birthdate. At that point, they ought to accept that you are not the person on the account.
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Brett Brett
yea. one among my friends became telling me how they checked his childrens Social and found out that like 5 human beings have been utilising it. i think you will get identity theft secure practices at your age!
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Brett Originally Answered: Is Grandma's estate being stolen?
I agree that the only way you MIGHT get some justice is to hire an attorney. Just be aware that after attorney's fees, there might be very little left to distribute. Still, you might decide it's worth the expense and hassle just to teach your sister a lesson. Only you can answer that. If you plan to take action, do it ASAP before your sister has a chance to spend down all the money in the account. Sorry this is happening to you. For what little comfort it's worth, this is a VERY common thing to happen. I've seen the same kind of thing in my husband's family, but my husband chose not to sue the offender.

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