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Ideas for a hindu story?

Ideas for a hindu story? Topic: How to write a story about friendship
July 16, 2019 / By Jaki
Question: so i need to create a story that includes the four hindu concepts, any ideas on what i should write about? i can make up gods and what not. your help is much appreciated :) pls nd thank you
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Best Answers: Ideas for a hindu story?

Enola Enola | 1 day ago
This story is from Pachatantra on behalf of Always good about friendship And this answer is dedicated to Always good Owl and swan were friends & owl is a bad omen The owl was trying to lead a king's army The king got angry on owl When he he shot an arrow at owl the owl hid behind the swan and the swan was killed Now the owl felt and learnt a lesson how it lost a noble friend (A big story is shortened small)
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Enola Originally Answered: Comparing/Contrasting the Greek Creation Story with the Hindu Creation Story.NEED HELP?
Dont panic. You've thought about similarities and differences and read the material which puts you way ahead of some of the losers and homework cheats who post here! Try these two techniques: 1) How long have you get to finish this? Just put the whole thing away for at least a half a day and go and do something else! Clear your head to make room for that insight! 2) Read some different books. Read Hesiod's Theogony or Ovid's Metamophoses. Read some creation myths that are not greek or hindu. Get a feel for how these myths are used in their cultures? Maybe looking at it from a different angle will spark something?
Enola Originally Answered: Comparing/Contrasting the Greek Creation Story with the Hindu Creation Story.NEED HELP?
Plato, in his dialogue Timaeus, describes a creation myth involving a being called the demiurge. The term refers in some belief systems to a deity responsible for the creation of the physical universe and the physical aspect of humanity. It occurs in a number of different religious and philosophical systems, most notably Platonism and Gnosticism. The precise nature and character of the Demiurge however varies considerably from system to system, being the benign architect of matter in some, to the personification of evil in others. Frequently, alternative titles are used for the Demiurge in these systems, including Yaldabaoth, Yao or Iao, Ialdabaoth and several other variants, such as Ptahil, used in Mandaeanism. Hesiod, in his Theogony, says that Chaos existed in the beginning, and then gave birth to Gaia (the Earth), Tartarus (the Underworld), Eros (desire), Nyx (the darkness of the night) and Erebus (the darkness of the Underworld). Gaia brought forth Ouranos, the starry sky, her equal, to cover her, the hills, and the fruitless deep of the Sea, Pontus, "without sweet union of love," out of her own self. Afterwards, Hesiod tells, she lay with Heaven and bore the World-Ocean Oceanus, Coeus and Crius and the Titans Hyperion and Iapetus, Theia and Rhea, Themis and Mnemosyne and Phoebe of the golden crown and lovely Tethys. "After them was born Cronos the wily, youngest and most terrible of her children, and he hated his lusty sire." Cronos, at Gaia's urging, castrates Ouranos. He marries Rhea who bears him Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Hades, Poseidon, and Zeus. Zeus and his brothers overthrow Cronos and the other Titans, then draw lots to determine what each of them will rule. Zeus draws heaven, Poseidon draws the sea, and Hades draws the underworld. The Earth was contested and no one of them had absolute sovereignty over it, as shown by Poseidon's anger when Zeus forced him to leave the battlefield in the Iliad. Plato, in his dialogue Timaeus, describes a creation myth involving a being called the demiurge. The term refers in some belief systems to a deity responsible for the creation of the physical universe and the physical aspect of humanity. It occurs in a number of different religious and philosophical systems, most notably Platonism and Gnosticism. The precise nature and character of the Demiurge however varies considerably from system to system, being the benign architect of matter in some, to the personification of evil in others. Frequently, alternative titles are used for the Demiurge in these systems, including Yaldabaoth, Yao or Iao, Ialdabaoth and several other variants, such as Ptahil, used in Mandaeanism. Hesiod, in his Theogony, says that Chaos existed in the beginning, and then gave birth to Gaia (the Earth), Tartarus (the Underworld), Eros (desire), Nyx (the darkness of the night) and Erebus (the darkness of the Underworld). Gaia brought forth Ouranos, the starry sky, her equal, to cover her, the hills, and the fruitless deep of the Sea, Pontus, "without sweet union of love," out of her own self. Afterwards, Hesiod tells, she lay with Heaven and bore the World-Ocean Oceanus, Coeus and Crius and the Titans Hyperion and Iapetus, Theia and Rhea, Themis and Mnemosyne and Phoebe of the golden crown and lovely Tethys. "After them was born Cronos the wily, youngest and most terrible of her children, and he hated his lusty sire." Cronos, at Gaia's urging, castrates Ouranos. He marries Rhea who bears him Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Hades, Poseidon, and Zeus. Zeus and his brothers overthrow Cronos and the other Titans, then draw lots to determine what each of them will rule. Zeus draws heaven, Poseidon draws the sea, and Hades draws the underworld. The Earth was contested and no one of them had absolute sovereignty over it, as shown by Poseidon's anger when Zeus forced him to leave the battlefield in the Iliad. Plato, in his dialogue Timaeus, describes a creation myth involving a being called the demiurge. The term refers in some belief systems to a deity responsible for the creation of the physical universe and the physical aspect of humanity. It occurs in a number of different religious and philosophical systems, most notably Platonism and Gnosticism. The precise nature and character of the Demiurge however varies considerably from system to system, being the benign architect of matter in some, to the personification of evil in others. Frequently, alternative titles are used for the Demiurge in these systems, including Yaldabaoth, Yao or Iao, Ialdabaoth and several other variants, such as Ptahil, used in Mandaeanism. Hesiod, in his Theogony, says that Chaos existed in the beginning, and then gave birth to Gaia (the Earth), Tartarus (the Underworld), Eros (desire), Nyx (the darkness of the night) and Erebus (the darkness of the Underworld). Gaia brought forth Ouranos, the starry sky, her equal, to cover her, the hills, and the fruitless deep of the Sea, Pontus, "without swe

Cilla Cilla
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This article uses bare URLs for citations. Please consider adding full citations so that the article remains verifiable in the future. Several templates and the Reflinks tool are available to assist in formatting. (Reflinks documentation) (October 2011) The Hindu is also the name of an Indian daily newspaper. For the former settlement in California, see Hindu, California. An article related to Hinduism Hindu • History Deities[show] Philosophy[show] Scriptures[show] Practices[show] Philosophers[show] Other Topics[show] Hinduism Portal Hindu Mythology Portal v · d · e Hindu ( pronunciation (help·info)) refers to an identity associated with the philosophical, religious and cultural systems that are indigenous to the Indian subcontinent. As used in the Constitution of India, the word "Hindu" is also attributed to all persons professing any Indian religion (i.e. Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism or Sikhism).[1] In common use today, it refers to an adherent of Hinduism. With more than a billion adherents, Hinduism is the world's third largest religion. The vast majority of Hindus, approximately 940 million, live in India.[2] Other countries with large Hindu populations include Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Mauritius, Suriname, Guyana, Trinidad & Tobago, Fiji and the island of Bali. Jesus saves John 3:16 SDA
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Azure Azure
i starred your question. i hope some members will come to answer your question. if no one come forward to answer, i will answer after one day.
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Azure Originally Answered: A non-Hindu visiting a Hindu Temple?
Wear relatively conservative attire. There's no need to dress in a business suit, but don't show up wearing cut-offs or a miniskirt or something. Remove your shoes on entering. There will probably be a place near the entrance with a bunch of shoes, leave yours there and proceed in socks or bare feet. Avoid wearing leather, but don't freak out if you forgot your belt or someting; you see plenty of practicing hindus with leather belts or shoes at temples. This should go without saying, but do not bring any drugs (including alcohol, caffeine and nicotine). Upon entering or leaving the actual temple room (the room with the deities) and especially in front of each deity it is a common sign of respect to perform a kneeling bow or a dandavat, but they won't expect this of you as an outsider. The deities may be recessed in very small rooms within the temple room. If they are, do NOT go into these small rooms. These are for the deities and priests. Above all else, just be respectful. Observe the practicing devotees and try to do what they do and don't worry too much. Indian people in foreign nations have been extremely welcoming and patient in my experience. Also, make damn sure you get some of the food there. Temples will always have prasadam available for a donation/fee and you don't want to miss out on that.

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