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Has this bubble already burst?

Has this bubble already burst? Topic: Case shiller home price index
May 21, 2019 / By Fionola
Question: The United States housing bubble is an economic bubble affecting many parts of the United States housing market in over half of American states. Housing prices peaked in early 2006, started to decline in 2006 and 2007, and may not yet have hit bottom as of 2011. On December 30, 2008 the Case-Shiller home price index reported its largest price drop in its history http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Stat...
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Best Answers: Has this bubble already burst?

Originally Answered: Is gold the next bubble that is going to burst?
Both potassium and sodium will ignite in air if already warmed a bit (I couldn't find the actual temperature needed). Both tend to explosively oxidize in water if you drop in a large enough piece; smaller pieces merely dance around on the surface spitting out flames. But, the one that really bursts into flames when exposed to air is phosphorus. Quite amazing. It's so reactive to the oxygen in the air (and in any other medium), that it's not found in elemental form in nature. Edit: From my own chem class days, I realized that lionne was probably right about the rarer alkili metals, so I checked. Rubidium will spontaneously ignite in air, and cesium will if heated. Francium is so rare (2nd rarest naturally-occurring element), that it appears the experiment has never been attempted (no weighable quantity has ever been isolated from the uranium ore that it's found in). It is also highly radioactive, with a half-life of only 22 minutes or less (depending on the isotope).
Originally Answered: Is gold the next bubble that is going to burst?
The most reactive of substances in the periodic table are the alkali metals: Lithium, Sodium, Potassium, Rubidium, Cesium and Francium. Starting from Rubidium, they explode in water and burn in air. Potassium is the most reactive substance you'd find at school, since the others are usually considered too dangerous. So my answer would be: Rubidium, Cesium, or Francium.

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