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Cuba's uncashed rent checks?

Cuba's uncashed rent checks? Topic: Finding credible sources for research papers
July 16, 2019 / By Fern
Question: Does anyone know of a good article about Cuba not cashing it's rent checks from the United States? Please don't send me to a website and tell me to search for it... I'm asking because I've searched and can't find one that looks credible enough to use as a source for a research paper.
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Best Answers: Cuba's uncashed rent checks?

Crystal Crystal | 8 days ago
credible papers are not usually free. try this: http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/N17200921.htm
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Crystal Originally Answered: Can my landlord charge me late rent fees for a rent increase that she didn't legally notify me of?
No she has to provide it to you in writing. Tell her that if she wants you to pay a rent increase that she has to notify you in writing and then 30 days from that notice you will start the increase, but don't do it until then. She can't make you pay late fees for this nor can she give you an eviction notice for something you weren't notified of. Don't pay until the month after you receive a written notice from her.
Crystal Originally Answered: Can my landlord charge me late rent fees for a rent increase that she didn't legally notify me of?
I would send a certified letter stating you had not been notified of any rent increase and asking her to prove that you received it. Second I would find out where you can get legal help and I would make sure that she is not reporting this on your credit report. She maybe able to evict you for any reason, and may still do so because many contracts have a 30 eviction clause written in them, but she should not be able to ruin your credit over this. It will only make it more difficult for you to find another apartment. This notification should have been done by mail with a return request so she had a signature. And if you can reach some agreement it seems like she should be willing to accept the amount of the increase but not the late charges especially as neither of you have proof of exactly what happened. Email is not a secure way to handle legal business transactions. Things still need to be in writing and have the proper signatures. Personally I am not even comfortable with the fact some places mail things through the regular mail and consider the fact they are not returned as proof of service. I know of cases where people state they have mailed things but really never have done so trying to cause problems in divorce cases. Where is the proof when it is required. A case of Cover your A** in my opinion
Crystal Originally Answered: Can my landlord charge me late rent fees for a rent increase that she didn't legally notify me of?
You are correct rent increase must be in writting and sent in the mail. Then the increase kicks in 30 days after. You should contact your local government or non-profit if you need legal help. Most areas have someone or organization to help with issues like this. Also - you have 90 days after an eviction notice has been given to leave. If I were you I would stop paying your landlord anything and start looking for a new place. This person sounds like more trouble then they are worth. And a TON of places have lowered their rent this year rather than upping it to draw in more renters.
Crystal Originally Answered: Can my landlord charge me late rent fees for a rent increase that she didn't legally notify me of?
My best advise for you is to tell her this... "I'm not paying the rent increase... don't like it? Take me to court!" She'll take you to small claims and in court you say that you never received written notice of the rental increase. She'll respond by saying she e-mailed it. You respond by saying you didn't get it. The onus is on HER to prove you got it via e-mail if she chose to do it that way... She won't win... case closed. She loses all "late" fees and increased rent costs. It really is as simple as that. It has to be in writing. Typically a new lease is drawn up and you both sign it. She'll send you the lease in the mail, you sign it and send it back and voila, it's a done deal. Or, she'll send a certified letter stating the rent increase for the next rent term and it has to be 30+ days in advance. You win... she has no case.

Crystal Originally Answered: Would I be able to go to Cuba?
For someone like you, it'll be very easy to go to Cuba. Just file for a "specific license". A specific license requires paperwork and State Department approval on case-by-case basis. You may be approved for a specific license if you fall into a certain class of persons. Note that a specific license may be granted to an institution (i.e. university, church) under whose auspices an individual may then travel without applying separately to the State department, or a specific license may be applied for and granted to an individual. Some of the classes of persons who may be granted a specific license are: *Persons visiting immediate family in Cuba *Full-time graduate students conducting academic research to be counted toward a graduate degree *Undergraduate or graduate students participating in a study abroad program of at least 10 weeks in length *Professors/teachers employed at a US institution travelling to Cuba to teach *Persons engaging in religious activities *Freelance journalists *Persons engaging in humanitarian projects *Persons engaging in non-profit cultural exhibitions If the family is not immediate, you can also take an insight tour through companies like insightCuba.com. Cuba is a beautiful country, I hope one day to visit as well.
Crystal Originally Answered: Would I be able to go to Cuba?
Yes you can go to Cuba. You can ask the US government for special permission. Or you can go through a third country, like Canada or Mexico. The second option isn't exactly legal, but the chances of getting caught/prosecuted are low.
Crystal Originally Answered: Would I be able to go to Cuba?
It's very unlikely you'd be admitted to Cuba usually you'd have to get a government grant to go there and seeing as to how you aren't going for anythin that is considered profesional business I doubt they would even consider letting you go

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