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Why were there sad Miserable Composers in the Romantic era, but not in the Classical & baroque Era?

Why were there sad Miserable Composers in the Romantic era, but not in the Classical & baroque Era? Topic: How to write a piano solo
June 17, 2019 / By Brier
Question: Seriously!! In the Baroque era and Classical era. Nobody was sad and troubled and melancholy and stuff And if they were how come it did NOT show in their music Haydn had kind of difficult life when he was a kid, That doesn't seem to interefere with his Music Mozart had Loads of problem!!! Problems with Money! problems with Leopold, he was Stressful due to a low income, But he wasn't really...you know? Sad. neither was Handel (handel was happy as heII) Bach Could not of been more happier Vivaldi Purcell You name it!!! NOW THE ROMANTIC ERA........ Beethoven was miserable Tchaikovsky was extemely frustrated and depressed Chopin was a sad emotional difficult guy Scumann?? please! The guy was a wreck!! he went crazy!! Debussy was sad and melancholy I would say the Ones that were kind of happy were mendelssohn Strauss Verdi Rimsky korsakov Grieg etc... But why?? Why were there not any sad miserable Compoers in the classical era and Baroque Eras???
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Best Answers: Why were there sad Miserable Composers in the Romantic era, but not in the Classical & baroque Era?

Aliah Aliah | 7 days ago
I'd say the biggest reason was the audience. Mozart wrote music for upper class people, who probably would rather hear uplifting music for a joyful evening. And Bach wrote a lot of music for church and for the organ, so those pieces are happier. But, when you think about it, not all Baroque and Classical were happy, and not all Romantic was sad. Some pieces to consider: Bach: Many organ works are in minor keys, his cello suite no. 5, his harpsichord concertos in minor keys, the Saint Matthew's Passion has sad moments Mozart: Even though he didn't completely write his famous Requiem, had he finished it it would certainly NOT be happy at all. Also, his Piano Concerto in C minor isn't too cheery. Beethoven: his major key symphonies (especially nos. 3 and 6, and the last movement of the 9th) Piano Concertos 1, 2, and 5 are very happy. And, he has many joyful sonatas. Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker has generally happy music. And the 1812 overture is overly celebratory. And his concert fantasy for piano and orchestra is mostly in a happy mood. Chopin has his share of happiness (waltzes, etudes, fantasia on Polish airs, impromptus) Schumann's Carnival is quite happy Debussy's sunken cathedral, arabesque, clair de lune, ect. And, you say Grieg was happy? How about his Symphony in C minor? Or his most famous work of all, the Piano Concerto in A minor? So these generalizations arn't fully true, yet classical tended to have more "happy" pieces because the audience wanted happy music. Later, composers started to write for concert halls for the general public, salons for solo instruments, and chamber works, where they could express themselves however they wanted.
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Aliah Originally Answered: Why were there sad Miserable Composers in the Romantic era, but not in the Classical & baroque Era?
I'd say the biggest reason was the audience. Mozart wrote music for upper class people, who probably would rather hear uplifting music for a joyful evening. And Bach wrote a lot of music for church and for the organ, so those pieces are happier. But, when you think about it, not all Baroque and Classical were happy, and not all Romantic was sad. Some pieces to consider: Bach: Many organ works are in minor keys, his cello suite no. 5, his harpsichord concertos in minor keys, the Saint Matthew's Passion has sad moments Mozart: Even though he didn't completely write his famous Requiem, had he finished it it would certainly NOT be happy at all. Also, his Piano Concerto in C minor isn't too cheery. Beethoven: his major key symphonies (especially nos. 3 and 6, and the last movement of the 9th) Piano Concertos 1, 2, and 5 are very happy. And, he has many joyful sonatas. Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker has generally happy music. And the 1812 overture is overly celebratory. And his concert fantasy for piano and orchestra is mostly in a happy mood. Chopin has his share of happiness (waltzes, etudes, fantasia on Polish airs, impromptus) Schumann's Carnival is quite happy Debussy's sunken cathedral, arabesque, clair de lune, ect. And, you say Grieg was happy? How about his Symphony in C minor? Or his most famous work of all, the Piano Concerto in A minor? So these generalizations arn't fully true, yet classical tended to have more "happy" pieces because the audience wanted happy music. Later, composers started to write for concert halls for the general public, salons for solo instruments, and chamber works, where they could express themselves however they wanted.

Tyrone Tyrone
Many Romantic pieces displayed the emotion that the composer was feeling at a certain time. For example, Beethoven wrote his Moonlight Sonata after he became deaf. Chopin longed to return to Poland and later contracted an illness and died. Tchaikovsky was most likely struggling with his homosexuality, which was not generally accepted at that time. Debussy ( more impressionist than romantic though) was stricken with cancer. Classical and Baroque pieces did not allow as much room for the expression of emotion. In addition, sometimes it is just luck. Many composers (with the exception of Mozart) had the blessing of a long life. Such as Bach. Some classical pieces though were somewhat melancholy, like Mozart's Requiem, which ironically was left unfinished at his death.
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Rik Rik
Simplest answer, Starting in the Baroque music was always written for either the church or some aristocrat, the composer wrote for these audiences. But as time went on, starting with Beethoven, composers began writing for themselves and putting themselves in the music. There is a quote from the movie "Eroica" which shows the premier of Beethoven's 3rd symphony at the end Haydn states "For the first time a composer has put himself into his music, everything is different from today" now Haydn was not actually at the premier it was just added for the movie but that quote still holds true.
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Merv Merv
There were some sad and miserable composers in the Baroque and Classical eras but they didn't whine about it. For example, when Michael Haydn's baby daughter died, he didn't go write Kindertotenlieder. (Though some people will then argue that the death of Archbishop Sigismund gave Haydn the opportunity to write a Requiem for his daughter). In the Romantic era, composers got all narcissistic and self-involved. And I just remembered: Mahler wrote Kindertotenlieder BEFORE his daughter died. They don't get any more narcissistic than that.
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Jordon Jordon
Your assertions are not true. I am sorry to say that. But you have made a good observation. Eg. Some of Beethoven's piano sonatas show traces of anguish, and Beethoven spans the Classical and Romantic eras. Your ideas are perhaps simplistic. Classical music requires many years of training and discernment. I am not claiming to be an expert but just offering my two cents (or pennies). Some of Scarlatti's piano sonatas do show some melancholy too. I have listened to Goldberg Variations written by J S Bach at least 40 times. Some Variations have a tinge of melancholy in them. But the "sad" parts are intricately embedded in the music, and you need to discern them. Whereas in Chopin's music, many phrases clearly shows his anguish for his country Poland when he was separated from his beloved country, and his middle and later music perhaps showed him being "tormented" by his disease. Perhaps, it has to do with the evolvement of classical music. The Romantic era music allows for more subjective expression of upheavals of emotions. Perhaps, the structures of Baroque music may not allow for great overt expressions of the Romantic notions of emotionalism. However, the great pianist Artur Rubinstein said that "all classical music is Romantic" in one sense. Perhaps, we could survey the lives of Bach, Mozart, Handel and other composers. Their lives were full of ups and downs, and they managed to triumph in difficult circumstances. Their belief in God helped. Human emotions have not changed much in the span of human history of more than 6000 years.
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Hanan Hanan
Very little in your thesis is based on fact. Sorry. Bach kvetched constantly about how he was abused. Like Mozart, he was captive to the Churchmen and nobles for whom he worked, his choristers were uneven in quality and under-diligent in their efforts, his world contrived to impoverish him, constantly (for instance, his letter to a cousin who had sent a cask of very expensive wine. By the time it arrived, the cost of the duty, coupled with the fact that the cask had been broken and only 1/4 of the original contents were still there, causing him to write that, for a present, it _really_ cost too much!) Vivaldi was persecuted by his own Churchmen, because he wasn't like them. Further, in the French High Baroque (Marais, Forqueray, etc) there was constant infighting which didn't stay in, with one viol master accusing another of being a fake or liar. These things affected their social status, their income and in some cases, their lives. They had to live amongst court intrigues which made the Star Chambre of Richelieu look like a sandbox. Their music portrays much of their grief, sorrow, misery...but you have to be familiar enough with the music to recognize it. Very few (although more than in previous centuries) are that familiar with Baroque music: Most think, if they've heard Glen Gould play a Bach Fugue or a computer mechanistically beating it out, that they know Bach or worse, know The Baroque. In the Renaissance period, there were both miserable composers and sad music. John Dowland even titled one of his songs "Semper Dowland, Semper Dolens" (Always Dowland, Always sad.) Listen to the lyrics to his Lachrimae, also called "Flow my tears" from its first line. With little work, I could illustrate the falsity of your primary premise all the way back to Guido. On the other hand, Mozart was largely happy through his life, a jokester of wit and, frankly, low rectitude. His letters make clear that he was no mad maudlin. Beethoven likewise: Neither of them suffered the level of misery that Haydn was offered as a liveried servant of his Patron. In fact, Beethoven straddles both Classical and Romantic eras, and if you can find sadness in the Three Movements (not just the slow one) of his Moonlight sonata, you're just projecting your own misery. Chopin was a nationalist and suffered from disease. He had a reason to be sad. And yet the majority of his work was not perceived as self-posessed misery, but rather as nationalistic, lifting his native Poland before the eyes of the world. Schumann and Schubert were close contemporaries, and the majority of their works are happy. It was the culture in Germany to be concerned with 'weltschmertz", the worries of the world if you will, but it wasn't that the composers were unhappy. (Yes, even the ones who went mad.) Tchaikovsky felt oppressed, but his music is not full of it. Quite the opposite: Listen to his first three symphonies, written in the height of the Romantic period, which are considerably less sad, meloncholie or depressed than the later three, written as we approached the Age of Unreason. On the other hand, many of the neo-classicists sound much more depressed than the romantics you name.
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Hanan Originally Answered: I hate my parents so much! why don't they see I'm miserable?
A lot of times parents can become callused to their children. They don't seem to understand their kids very well and its hard for the kids. Some parents never got much acknowledgement from their parents and are not used to giving it to their kids. Your parents grew up in a different generation, a different culture, and cant always connect or see if something is bugging you. To be honest love is hard to earn, and with some people its impossible to earn theirs. Best thing to do is just follow your own path and do the best you can, if its good enough for you it should be good enough for them. And to the if god is good, its very well possible if you have children , because of the way your parents treated you, you will treat them better, or maybe it will just give you a perspective others don't have. If nothing else, get a friend to talk to it about on a regular basis, that helps me out alot. =)

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