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Torn between two stables?

Torn between two stables? Topic: Switch case smaller than life
June 17, 2019 / By Alexia
Question: Well, let me start by saying that it's hard to find good stables in the Chicago area. There are some, but there are few great ones. I'm currently riding at a fantastic stable and I'm happy there. It isn't the nicest looking place and they don't have the nicest horses (personality and appearance-wise) but the people are friendly and my instructor is great. Today after my lesson I went to a burger place with my mom and the lady at the table next to us asked me where I rode, because I was in the usual riding-day attire with the boots and such. I said blabbity bla and she said her daughter used to ride at the same place, but now rides at such and such. She went on for a few minutes and described the details of the stable: There is a champion instructor in charge of all lessons and the barn is more for devoted teens, despite the fact that barn life is more independent because the stable is so small. Both facts caught my attention. Well, when I got home I looked up the other stable and WOW. The stable itself looks so much nicer, and the pictures of the riders are fantastic. I can't spot a thing wrong with most of them. Not only that, but the horses look to be in much better shape and have better grooming. Overall, the stable was equal if not better than the one I'm riding at now. So I'm torn. I want to take a lesson there, just to see if it's all it's cracked up to be. But if it is, I love the stable I'm at now and I don't want to leave, but at the same time, I want to advance in my riding and if that's what I have to do, should I go? I'm so lost. :( Help/Advice?
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Best Answers: Torn between two stables?

Tybalt Tybalt | 2 days ago
It can be so difficult to make choices like this. I understand your dilemma. But keep in mind that you were happy at your current barn before you even heard of this other place. Now that you've heard of the other place, you're suffering from the "the grass is always greener on the other side" syndrome. The other stable might truly be even better than your current one, but keep in mind that appearances are not everything. Sometimes the shabby looking places are actually the most honest and friendly, while the fancy places come with tons of drama and hassle. Here's what I would do. Just drop by the new barn at a time when it's likely to be busy with lessons, like a Saturday afternoon. Stroll on up to the side of the ring and watch for a while. See if anybody bothers to come greet you. If so, explain that you are looking for a new stable and want to observe. Stick around and watch a few lessons. Also go "behind the scenes" in the barn and talk to the students. Just strike up a chat and see what they say. Are they happy? Snobby? Friendly? If you like what you see, then you can set up a lesson. If the lesson goes well (you may want to take more than 1 to be sure) then let your current instructor know that you've decided to switch barns. Tell her how much you appreciate all her help over the years, And once you move to the new barn, NEVER say anything bad about your old barn. They don't deserve that. Just be sure that it's what you want. Think about your goals. Do you just want to ride for fun and achieve personal goals, or do you want to compete and win? Also make sure that you will fit in with the people at the other barn. Often the fancy barns have snobby people. Hopefully that's not the case. Good luck with whatever you decide!
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Tybalt Originally Answered: Torn between two stables?
It can be so difficult to make choices like this. I understand your dilemma. But keep in mind that you were happy at your current barn before you even heard of this other place. Now that you've heard of the other place, you're suffering from the "the grass is always greener on the other side" syndrome. The other stable might truly be even better than your current one, but keep in mind that appearances are not everything. Sometimes the shabby looking places are actually the most honest and friendly, while the fancy places come with tons of drama and hassle. Here's what I would do. Just drop by the new barn at a time when it's likely to be busy with lessons, like a Saturday afternoon. Stroll on up to the side of the ring and watch for a while. See if anybody bothers to come greet you. If so, explain that you are looking for a new stable and want to observe. Stick around and watch a few lessons. Also go "behind the scenes" in the barn and talk to the students. Just strike up a chat and see what they say. Are they happy? Snobby? Friendly? If you like what you see, then you can set up a lesson. If the lesson goes well (you may want to take more than 1 to be sure) then let your current instructor know that you've decided to switch barns. Tell her how much you appreciate all her help over the years, And once you move to the new barn, NEVER say anything bad about your old barn. They don't deserve that. Just be sure that it's what you want. Think about your goals. Do you just want to ride for fun and achieve personal goals, or do you want to compete and win? Also make sure that you will fit in with the people at the other barn. Often the fancy barns have snobby people. Hopefully that's not the case. Good luck with whatever you decide!

Rickey Rickey
If you haven't improved, and want to move on, ask if you could possibly watch or take a lesson to see if you like it. You could have a tour and see what the barn is about. Make sure that you get permission, as some owners get mad. If you really like what you see weigh the pros and cons of staying and moving. Whatever one seems to have the better outcome, then move there. Make sure you take into account the board and lesson costs, in case you get a horse, and lessons with a Champ riding will most likely be more expensive then at the barn you are at now. Once you do that, discuss it with your mom, or whoever will be driving you to and from the barn, and who will be paying ofr everything. Good Luck!
👍 70 | 👎 -4

Merle Merle
well, i say, if its not broke, don't fix it. sometimes the nicer the stable, the nicer the horses, the more anal people can be about things that may not be visible to the naked eye. they may be particular about things to do with tack, or get touchy about the horses, etc etc. you just never know and its like finding a needle in a haystack when u find a stable that you love and have no problems with. i'd say, stay where you are, because in my experience horse people can be B*tches and sticky about stupid things that you don't find out for the first few rides. if you know what to expect at ur current stable, then stay put :)
👍 69 | 👎 -10

Jonty Jonty
something similar happened to me! i rode at this place it was kind of crappy but i loved my trainner but the ppl that owned the stable always randomly changed my horses, the barn wasent heated ect, and i had heard about this other barn i went there for a camp loved it and i statred taking lessons there and four years latter i am prety happy there i love the horses. if i were you i would try it for a couple days
👍 68 | 👎 -16

Ham Ham
Just to let you know It may be a nicer looking but the people may be ruder. My cousin had the same experience just about but she found out through a friend. She ended up with her old place because of the people and everything. It depends.
👍 67 | 👎 -22

Ham Originally Answered: Torn between two stables?
It can be so difficult to make choices like this. I understand your dilemma. But keep in mind that you were happy at your current barn before you even heard of this other place. Now that you've heard of the other place, you're suffering from the "the grass is always greener on the other side" syndrome. The other stable might truly be even better than your current one, but keep in mind that appearances are not everything. Sometimes the shabby looking places are actually the most honest and friendly, while the fancy places come with tons of drama and hassle. Here's what I would do. Just drop by the new barn at a time when it's likely to be busy with lessons, like a Saturday afternoon. Stroll on up to the side of the ring and watch for a while. See if anybody bothers to come greet you. If so, explain that you are looking for a new stable and want to observe. Stick around and watch a few lessons. Also go "behind the scenes" in the barn and talk to the students. Just strike up a chat and see what they say. Are they happy? Snobby? Friendly? If you like what you see, then you can set up a lesson. If the lesson goes well (you may want to take more than 1 to be sure) then let your current instructor know that you've decided to switch barns. Tell her how much you appreciate all her help over the years, And once you move to the new barn, NEVER say anything bad about your old barn. They don't deserve that. Just be sure that it's what you want. Think about your goals. Do you just want to ride for fun and achieve personal goals, or do you want to compete and win? Also make sure that you will fit in with the people at the other barn. Often the fancy barns have snobby people. Hopefully that's not the case. Good luck with whatever you decide!

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