4295 Shares

I have a question in philosophy?

I have a question in philosophy? Topic: Why we must do homework for money
June 20, 2019 / By Genna
Question: Can you explain: What is the direct consequence if men does not use his brain when his two busy components which are intellect & will in order for him to make the right decisions? pls.help me with this...its my homework. PLEASE and THANK YOU! ^^ 10pts.whoever gets the best answer*...thnx that's what the professor gave us..i already have an answer on that but i want to add more informations..so,that's why i ask help from you guys..ok ,thanks anyway for answering..^^
Best Answer

Best Answers: I have a question in philosophy?

Delicia Delicia | 3 days ago
He wastes his time on Yahoo Answers, LOL The real answer: Intellect and will in isolation are not helpful without a rational framework for decision making. First of all, one must define what is meant by "right" decisions. Decisions that are morally right? And if so, by whose standards do we determine what is morally right? Or, do we mean "right" as in creating the most advantage for the man making the decision, ie: selfish best interest? What if cheating, lying, and stealing make lots and lots of money for the man and he is able to live a life of great comfort and happiness. Is that the "right" decision? Or what if he helps everyone altruistically and feeds the hungry and then dies penniless? Is that the "right" decision? The will and the intellect both depend on a rational framework for decision making, otherwise they are without meaning.
👍 274 | 👎 3
Did you like the answer? I have a question in philosophy? Share with your friends

We found more questions related to the topic: Why we must do homework for money


Delicia Originally Answered: I have a question in philosophy?
He wastes his time on Yahoo Answers, LOL The real answer: Intellect and will in isolation are not helpful without a rational framework for decision making. First of all, one must define what is meant by "right" decisions. Decisions that are morally right? And if so, by whose standards do we determine what is morally right? Or, do we mean "right" as in creating the most advantage for the man making the decision, ie: selfish best interest? What if cheating, lying, and stealing make lots and lots of money for the man and he is able to live a life of great comfort and happiness. Is that the "right" decision? Or what if he helps everyone altruistically and feeds the hungry and then dies penniless? Is that the "right" decision? The will and the intellect both depend on a rational framework for decision making, otherwise they are without meaning.

Bryanna Bryanna
You didn't word your question well. Are you asking what is the consequence if man doesn't use his brain, since it takes intellect and will for good decisions? Since it is your homework, what do you think? What would happen if someone did not use intellect or will for a decision? What other creatures can you think of that do not use those things? Sounds like people would run on instinct then, huh? Or would it be something else? Put your intellect to work... ☺
👍 120 | 👎 -2

Allannah Allannah
It sounds like whoever assigned you this homework question had Plato in mind. Plato said that there are three components to the soul: the intellect, the will, and the appetites. When the intellect abdicates, the will ceases to receive rational instructions, and the appetites govern -- chaos results.
👍 118 | 👎 -7

Urijah Urijah
Your decision will not be the best, you must use intellect for the best result. The long term result of using your brain will almost always be the best, but spontaneity does have its benefits, so both have an important role in our lives, you just have to know when to use them. Experience in life will let you know the perfect balance.
👍 116 | 👎 -12

Roderic Roderic
I believe the consequence would be nothing happens. If you have no will to do something, would you do anything? Now if some action MIRACULOUSLY took place, your decision might have been undesirable or unorthodox compared to society as well as being completly spontanous (no gap of which you were thinking). As a consequence you might later regret it or be shunned. But i know a lot of religions/philosophies that advocate not using your mind, or rather "empty thought."
👍 114 | 👎 -17

Roderic Originally Answered: Philosophy?
A basic civilizational change in the West has been noted by Flynn. Namely, 100 years ago, if you were to ask most people what "dog and rabbit" had in common, the answer would be concrete and experiential: "the dog chases the rabbit." This conformed to their experience. Today, the same question to most people gives something more abstract, like "they are mammals." The Flynn effect is a documentable rise in IQ test scores on a decadal basis. Its cause is the more abstract and connected level of secular, practical education which has moved in western society in the past 100 years. The Flynn effect is thought by some to be an artifact of a rise in emphasis on abstract connectedness, e.g. knowing that "rabbits and dogs" are "mammals." This promotes a certain test-wise score increase. However, in contradistinction, 100 years ago, literacy levels were higher in e.g. America, grammar and writing skills demonstrably more advanced, and audiences of ordinary folk typically listened and followed complex political debates with much more ease than do audiences today. There is a well-known science fiction story, "The Marching Morons," which may typifiy this latter "gee, we're more advanced" notion, much as U.S. students think they're excellent at math, but typically score below average among nations: a few geniuses, with lots of mass merchandising, sell cars with fins, loud engines, etc. to the "MM." The "MM" think they're getting hot stuff, but in reality they're going slower. A similar event occurred with SAT scores in the late 1970s or early 1980s, when student SAT scores were going down, down, down, so the SAT people "renormed" them, adding dozens of points to the "new, improved" SAT, so now people think they're doing just about as well as the 1960s group, but in reality, they're scoring perhaps 50-100 points lower, as a group. "Climb the Highest Mountain," Mark Prophet, has some good insights into how such things happen. cordially, j.

If you have your own answer to the question why we must do homework for money, then you can write your own version, using the form below for an extended answer.