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Which explains why radioactive waste is so difficult to get rid of?

Which explains why radioactive waste is so difficult to get rid of? Topic: Homeworks electrical products
June 25, 2019 / By Rowan
Question: A) Low electrical charge B) High electrical charge C) Long half-life of waste products D) Short half-life of waste products
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Best Answers: Which explains why radioactive waste is so difficult to get rid of?

Monty Monty | 9 days ago
C--do you understand half-life and what makes this the correct answer? I hope so because some people might resent doing others homework and give them a wrong answer...Just food for thought... Always confirm your answers.
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Monty Originally Answered: What are some radioactive waste disposal policies in the U.S?
You might want to look into "molten salt" reactors which offer much safer means of generating electricty than water-cooled reactors and disposing of existing stockpiles of spent nuclear fuel. http://home.earthlink.net/~bhoglund/what... "The notable features of this reactor are: Meltdown proof Does not produce weapons grade plutonium Has inherent non-proliferation features Thousands of years of energy Simplified fuel cycle (no fuel elements nor reprocessing required) Its wastes are simpler and less toxic than current nuclear wastes Only hundreds of years of storage versus thousands for the current wastes Can completely destroy military plutonium Can burn the existing wastes (spent fuel)! Higher thermal efficiencies (operates at a "Red Heat"; ~700° C [1,260° F])" Main link......... http://home.earthlink.net/~bhoglund/ Another process being considered is 'plasma-gasification" which employs a method of using intense heat to break down wastes including nuclear into their primary elements....converting that into electricity and little residual waste which would be non-radioactive. There are some problems with the metallurgy of existing designs though. http://www.plasmagasification.com/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_arc_gasification
Monty Originally Answered: What are some radioactive waste disposal policies in the U.S?
of all the disposal equipment I even have heard of, there is largely one million that ensures everlasting secure practices, thats unload it into the solar. bit high priced good now, yet as quickly as the gap elevator and image voltaic sails have been perfected, it's going to be tremendously inexpensive for now, burrying it in granite cliffs could do the trick an significant element to bear in mind is that there isnt a brilliant number of common waste (uranuim and plutonium), worldwide huge finished common waste so a techniques is related to the size of a brilliant place of work block. secondary waste (contaminated aspects) now thats a issue

Kearney Kearney
It is difficult to get rid off because once politicians find somebody stupid enough to allow it to be stored at a location "temporarily" then they have no incentive to have it stored in a safe location such as within a prepared salt dome in a tectonically stable area. In my Province the government look like they will accept a 30 year "short term" storage at a tectonically active location with abundant normal and wrench faulting to surface, which is open to a dozen regional aquifers and one major transcontinental river system. I am not sure that politicians know the answer to your homework question...maybe you should email the YA that you get! EDIt...by the way...my research shows Elton John to be a bad singer but a very good source of scientific information :0)
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Kearney Originally Answered: What if we shipped all of our nuclear waste, garbage and industrial waste to Antarctica?
Nope. It is too expensive. There are international treaties against it. And there is no reason to ship these things to the south pole because there are plenty of safe ways to handle it in the countries where they are generated. Those things that are politically unpopular aren't going to get any more popular to support the idea of sending them to Antarctica.
Kearney Originally Answered: What if we shipped all of our nuclear waste, garbage and industrial waste to Antarctica?
antartica and the north pole are the only places that have not been totally destroyed and draines. dumping all that waste over time would increase the temp. and cause the ice caps to melt raising sea levels and causing to many bad things to explain

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