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Vietnam war? anyone who witnessed/experienced/remember it?

Vietnam war? anyone who witnessed/experienced/remember it? Topic: How to write a short news report
June 15, 2019 / By Abaigeal
Question: i have a few questions, if you won't mind answering... 1) How did you feel about the Vietnam War at the time? 2) How were you affected by it? 3) How was the U.S. affected? 4) How was the world affected? 5) Should the U.S. be appreciated or not for its involvement in the war? Why? 6) Describe your personal experience/thoughts on the war. thanks a lott. it's for my history project. thanks, but i'd actually like to have some of YOUR responses. i already looked up stuff i needed. now it's time to add detail.
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Best Answers: Vietnam war? anyone who witnessed/experienced/remember it?

Spike Spike | 7 days ago
I'd like to answer this question though I was born in 1967, so my direct experiences are limited. I'm writing a few minor personal recollections with some notes (opinions, partly) concerning the war. I remember the POW's returning from Vietnam. My mother insisted on watching it. Whenever I ask her about the war, she says it was awful to see the names of the soldiers killled running on the news each week. 1). I was too young to have an opinion on the war. I remember my father driving on Sunday mornings to a veterans memorial in North Edison, NJ, where an honor guard of VFW had a short ceremony and fired a volley in memory of those who had been killed in Vietnam the prior week. 2.) I was involved in the military at a young age (as a cadet, I played Taps at Veterans ceremonies), and saw a core group of people who felt patriotic and who honored the veterans in the years after 1975. I recall a parade for Vietnam Veterans which was organized in Edison about 1981, and it was canceled due to a lack of interest. I always felt that the veterans never received proper recognition for their devotion and sacrifice. That is true today. 3.) The US suffered a loss of morale after the Vietnam War. The Iran Hostage Crisis and failed rescue attempt exacerbated this. Like him or not, Reagan rehabilitated the US Military and used military strength wisely and in a limited manner. The successful liberation of Grenada and the raid on Qaddafi were the first signs the US Military had recovered from the Vietnam War. 4.) The implications for Southeast Asia were horrific. America abandoned Vietnam in 1973 and stabbed the South Vietnamese in the back. Congress refused to assist President Thieu or the South Vietnamese government, essentially abandoning them to a Communist invasion. The disastrous evacuation of Saigon was a direct result of this neglect. Thousands of refugees flooded the ports and airports as the Communists moved south. Collaborators of the South and America were imprisoned and punished. The bombings in Cambodia had set the stage for the rise of Pol Pot and the Khymer Rouge- which coincided with the fall of South Vietnam. 5.) Yes and no. Intentions were correct at the beginning- the North had invaded the south and massacred entire villages if they refused to collaborate with the Communists. The war was mismanaged almost from the beginning. Rules of Engagement, Free-Fire Zones, rotating individuals in and out rather than entire units, all these were a recipe for disaster. All too often the war became a means for self-interested officers who were seeking personal glory. The draft brought in soldiers who did not want to be there, lowering morale, and precipitated further protests and riots in the States. 6.) America left Vietnam in the exact same condition as it had entered it, only several million Vietnamese and 58,000 Americans dead. American presence inadvertently created conditions for the rise of Pol Pot and the so-called "Killing Fields." American soldiers died to fulfill the ambitions of Washington politicians. The lessons were not learned, and many of the same mistakes have been made in Iraq and Afghanistan- imposing "Rules of Engagement" and not fully comprehending the implications of involvement. (Most Middle East experts state the Iraq War removed the restraints on Iran; American involvement in Vietnam strengthened Communist movements in Laos and Cambodia, though the reasons are different- Washington politicians seem blind to the long-term implications of American military involvement.) Also, one of the finest books on Vietnam veterans is Stolen Valor, by B.G. Burkett. This book explains the stigma veterans have endured, and exposes the many phony veterans who exacerbate this stigma. The Edmunton Oklahoma Postal shooting in 1986, for instance- it was reported the man was a traumatized Vietnam veteran. He was never in Vietnam, but the media insisted on reporting it. The case of William Calley and the My Lai Massacre is fascinating and revealing. Supporters of the Vietnam War generally wanted Calley found guilty, opposers wanted him acquitted. Dr. Spock actually supported Calley. The rationale was that Calley was following orders of the US Government, and he was simply following the policy of "Free Fire Zones." Opposers of the war felt that if Calley was acquitted, it would justify atrocities committed in Vietnam by absolving American policy, which they contended was the true cause of the My Lai Massacre.
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Spike Originally Answered: Vietnam war? anyone who witnessed/experienced/remember it?
I'd like to answer this question though I was born in 1967, so my direct experiences are limited. I'm writing a few minor personal recollections with some notes (opinions, partly) concerning the war. I remember the POW's returning from Vietnam. My mother insisted on watching it. Whenever I ask her about the war, she says it was awful to see the names of the soldiers killled running on the news each week. 1). I was too young to have an opinion on the war. I remember my father driving on Sunday mornings to a veterans memorial in North Edison, NJ, where an honor guard of VFW had a short ceremony and fired a volley in memory of those who had been killed in Vietnam the prior week. 2.) I was involved in the military at a young age (as a cadet, I played Taps at Veterans ceremonies), and saw a core group of people who felt patriotic and who honored the veterans in the years after 1975. I recall a parade for Vietnam Veterans which was organized in Edison about 1981, and it was canceled due to a lack of interest. I always felt that the veterans never received proper recognition for their devotion and sacrifice. That is true today. 3.) The US suffered a loss of morale after the Vietnam War. The Iran Hostage Crisis and failed rescue attempt exacerbated this. Like him or not, Reagan rehabilitated the US Military and used military strength wisely and in a limited manner. The successful liberation of Grenada and the raid on Qaddafi were the first signs the US Military had recovered from the Vietnam War. 4.) The implications for Southeast Asia were horrific. America abandoned Vietnam in 1973 and stabbed the South Vietnamese in the back. Congress refused to assist President Thieu or the South Vietnamese government, essentially abandoning them to a Communist invasion. The disastrous evacuation of Saigon was a direct result of this neglect. Thousands of refugees flooded the ports and airports as the Communists moved south. Collaborators of the South and America were imprisoned and punished. The bombings in Cambodia had set the stage for the rise of Pol Pot and the Khymer Rouge- which coincided with the fall of South Vietnam. 5.) Yes and no. Intentions were correct at the beginning- the North had invaded the south and massacred entire villages if they refused to collaborate with the Communists. The war was mismanaged almost from the beginning. Rules of Engagement, Free-Fire Zones, rotating individuals in and out rather than entire units, all these were a recipe for disaster. All too often the war became a means for self-interested officers who were seeking personal glory. The draft brought in soldiers who did not want to be there, lowering morale, and precipitated further protests and riots in the States. 6.) America left Vietnam in the exact same condition as it had entered it, only several million Vietnamese and 58,000 Americans dead. American presence inadvertently created conditions for the rise of Pol Pot and the so-called "Killing Fields." American soldiers died to fulfill the ambitions of Washington politicians. The lessons were not learned, and many of the same mistakes have been made in Iraq and Afghanistan- imposing "Rules of Engagement" and not fully comprehending the implications of involvement. (Most Middle East experts state the Iraq War removed the restraints on Iran; American involvement in Vietnam strengthened Communist movements in Laos and Cambodia, though the reasons are different- Washington politicians seem blind to the long-term implications of American military involvement.) Also, one of the finest books on Vietnam veterans is Stolen Valor, by B.G. Burkett. This book explains the stigma veterans have endured, and exposes the many phony veterans who exacerbate this stigma. The Edmunton Oklahoma Postal shooting in 1986, for instance- it was reported the man was a traumatized Vietnam veteran. He was never in Vietnam, but the media insisted on reporting it. The case of William Calley and the My Lai Massacre is fascinating and revealing. Supporters of the Vietnam War generally wanted Calley found guilty, opposers wanted him acquitted. Dr. Spock actually supported Calley. The rationale was that Calley was following orders of the US Government, and he was simply following the policy of "Free Fire Zones." Opposers of the war felt that if Calley was acquitted, it would justify atrocities committed in Vietnam by absolving American policy, which they contended was the true cause of the My Lai Massacre.

Spike Originally Answered: Why did the u.s become involved in vietnam during the vietnam war?
During Dwight Eisenhower's presidency, his Secretary of State, John Foster Dulles, advocated an aggressive stance against communism. He warned of the "domino theory",which warned that if a South East Asian country fell to Communism control, the rest of the region would follow, until eventually, New Zealand and Australia would become communist countries. France, in the early 50's, was interested in recapturing its' former colony, Indochina, AKA Vietnam. However, in 1954, Vietnam was split into northern and southern sections. After the French left, Vietnamese Communists, led by Ho Chi Minh, gained control of Norther Vietnam. To prevent southern Vietnam from falling under Communist control, the U.S. gave aid in forms of money and military advisers. The amount of aid jumped slightly during JFK's presidency, but it wouldn't be until LBJ's presidency that Vietnam would become a major issue. In 1964, LBJ reported that Vietnamese Communists had attacked U.S. ships in the Tonkin Gulf. The resulting Tonkin Gulf Resolution gave LBJ a "blank check" to fight the war in Vietnam. It was later revealed that the reports of the attack were false. Anyway, that's how the U.S. entered the war. As for the rest of your question; the effects of the war include an all volunteer army, many americans lost faith in their government as well as the military, the expansion of communism was checked (although it is debatable as to why it didn;t spread. It is probable that the war had little effect on its' spread and Dulles' domino theory was exaggerated.), many veterans faced psychological disorders, and it led to Nixon taking over as president. Nixon would begin the process of detente, which was a reduction in Cold War tensions between the U.S. and Soviet Union.
Spike Originally Answered: Why did the u.s become involved in vietnam during the vietnam war?
The individuals grew to become in touch interior the 1st Indochina conflict while they began to furnish France became nevertheless battling the Viet Minh, who have been battling for independence and a socialist republic for all of Vietnam. (1946-1954) Allen Dulles even presented using nuclear weapons to the French distant places minister. what's extra considerable to undergo in ideas, jamesmom2, is that the Vietnamese (Ho Chi Minh) asked for non-militia assistance after asserting independence in 1945 and have been surpassed over via united states of america. So, it easily wasn't the Vietnamese who invited the individuals to invade their united states of america! As for the fake Flag operation, common because of the fact the 'Gulf of Tonkin Incident' the individuals staged this adventure, because of the fact that on the time (1964), the two the yankee covert conflict (CIA) and that waged via the dictator interior the south of Vietnam had failed. The Vietnamese nationwide Liberation front have been prevailing, and purely U. S. floor forces could provide up them. So, the individuals conceived the full "Vietnamese patrol boats fired on U. S. vessels" to help the fake declare they have been purely actively defensively and to get help from the yankee Congress to incredibly flow to conflict with Vietnam devoid of asserting conflict on Vietnam. ROBERT could seem into fake Flag operations.
Spike Originally Answered: Why did the u.s become involved in vietnam during the vietnam war?
Well,after world war 2, the cold war began,which means tensions between countries became very strained,meaning that the us and russia were always preparing for a war with each other yet they never actually fought. The reason we were in vietnam was because the communist influence reached Asia by then and we believed that if one country fell to communism,then the rest in the region would fall to communism too.This is called the domino theory.

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