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Developing film for a diana camera?

Developing film for a diana camera? Topic: Media research group jobs
June 25, 2019 / By Kennedy
Question: i've been doing some research about different vintage style cameras, and ive decided i want the diana camera. it takes medium fromat 120 medium film....? i was wondering if i had to take this to a special place to get it developed. or is the local wallgreens fit fo the job?
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Best Answers: Developing film for a diana camera?

Hizkijah Hizkijah | 6 days ago
120 film is a little more difficult to deal with, since there are fewer labs that can process it. Ask around at your local Walmart, Costco or other 1-hour labs. While they may not be able to process the film on site, many of these labs will send the film out to be processed for you. The next option is to find a local pro-lab. These are labs that specifically cater to professional photographers and will be able to process your film on site. As you might imagine, it can be a little pricey. Another film processing option is to send out the film to be processed. Check out these processors, they both offer processing by mail: http://www.dwaynesphoto.com/ http://www.swanphotolabs.com/swan08/inde... Then the best of all option, process the film yourself. BW film processing and even color processing are not too difficult to learn and also not very expensive to get into. I usually like to recommend the Holga 120N or 120FN for beginners. Why? It's a cheaper and simpler camera to learn with. If you get this camera it keeps the cost of exploring toy camera photography on the cheap side. If it turns out that toy camera photography is your passion, then you can explore getting the Diana+ or vintage Diana. Let's look at the cost: Holga 120N - $28 (no flash, but with a hotshoe) Holga 120FN - $38 (built-in flash) Diana+ - $50 (no flash, no hotshoe) DianaF+ - $100 (comes with electronic flash attachment and hotshoe accessory) vintage Diana - price is variable ($10-100), depending somewhat on luck and whether you get a Diana or a clone, like an Arrow or Banner. Sample Photos: Holga http://www.flickr.com/groups/[email protected] Diana+ DIanaF+ http://www.flickr.com/groups/diana_plus/ If you think that 120 film is too much trouble, you can try a 35mm camera, like the Holga 135BC. While I find that something gets lost in the smaller negative and rectangular format, it might work for you. Check out these photos: http://www.flickr.com/groups/holga135bc/ The Diana+ cameras can be found at some stores like Urban Outfitters, or online at http://lomography.com If you want an original vintage Diana, look on ebay. Whichever camera you choose, remember that the point of lo-fi photography is to have fun and don't sweat the details! Please check out my website: http://www.dianacamera.com/ I have lots of tips, tricks and photos taken with plastic cameras. For how-to videos for Holgas and Diana cameras, check out my youtube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/kaituba
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Hizkijah Originally Answered: Developing film for a diana camera?
120 film is a little more difficult to deal with, since there are fewer labs that can process it. Ask around at your local Walmart, Costco or other 1-hour labs. While they may not be able to process the film on site, many of these labs will send the film out to be processed for you. The next option is to find a local pro-lab. These are labs that specifically cater to professional photographers and will be able to process your film on site. As you might imagine, it can be a little pricey. Another film processing option is to send out the film to be processed. Check out these processors, they both offer processing by mail: http://www.dwaynesphoto.com/ http://www.swanphotolabs.com/swan08/inde... Then the best of all option, process the film yourself. BW film processing and even color processing are not too difficult to learn and also not very expensive to get into. I usually like to recommend the Holga 120N or 120FN for beginners. Why? It's a cheaper and simpler camera to learn with. If you get this camera it keeps the cost of exploring toy camera photography on the cheap side. If it turns out that toy camera photography is your passion, then you can explore getting the Diana+ or vintage Diana. Let's look at the cost: Holga 120N - $28 (no flash, but with a hotshoe) Holga 120FN - $38 (built-in flash) Diana+ - $50 (no flash, no hotshoe) DianaF+ - $100 (comes with electronic flash attachment and hotshoe accessory) vintage Diana - price is variable ($10-100), depending somewhat on luck and whether you get a Diana or a clone, like an Arrow or Banner. Sample Photos: Holga http://www.flickr.com/groups/[email protected] Diana+ DIanaF+ http://www.flickr.com/groups/diana_plus/ If you think that 120 film is too much trouble, you can try a 35mm camera, like the Holga 135BC. While I find that something gets lost in the smaller negative and rectangular format, it might work for you. Check out these photos: http://www.flickr.com/groups/holga135bc/ The Diana+ cameras can be found at some stores like Urban Outfitters, or online at http://lomography.com If you want an original vintage Diana, look on ebay. Whichever camera you choose, remember that the point of lo-fi photography is to have fun and don't sweat the details! Please check out my website: http://www.dianacamera.com/ I have lots of tips, tricks and photos taken with plastic cameras. For how-to videos for Holgas and Diana cameras, check out my youtube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/kaituba

Elvin Elvin
Umm, if it's vintage you want, there are a ton of choices out there. You know the Diana is a toy camera, right? As is the Holga. They're made mostly of cheap plastic and have light leaks, et cetera. If you already know all this, go for it. Some people like them. Just don't buy one new. I know the Holga is still made. I'm not sure about the Diana, but the Holgas cost way more than they're worth new. TLR's are fun, and they use 120/220 roll film, too (at least all the ones I've seen). As long as you use C-41 process film, you may be able to get it done some places, though it may be a gamble unless you find a professional photo lab. In that case you're fine. If you shoot black and white, you can develop it yourself relatively easily. You'd need a changing bag, development tank, and chemicals. Then you'll need to get the negatives printed, though.
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Clayton Clayton
What do you mean by blank? Were the negatives completely dark? If so then you may have really over-exposed. Or, did the negatives look nearly clear? In that case you would have under-exposed. Study up on exposure and read the manual that came with the camera.
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Amos Amos
You will need a good Pro lab to develop it. Most places like walgreens can only handle 35mm. Pro labs are easily found in the yellow pages. :) What you are doing sounds really fun!
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Tony Tony
Please don't laugh, Wal-Mart can do it affordably. Use their send out Kiosk. They use Fujifilm labs to process 120 and it only takes about a week or so.
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Tony Originally Answered: How can i stop an argument developing?
Well, I mean you should probably first think about the good things of him and the good times and how things have changed since it's been 10 years. I'm had experiences with this... with my mom... who has it with my dad and doesn't notice that she does it to me too... And honestly, if I were you and I had a partner like that then I'd probably dump the person. But this all depends on the good times that you've had and whether you've talked to him about this. Try to talk with him as calmly and peacefully as you can and explain. Maybe it's just a misunderstanding? Or you guys could work things out for both of you. Or that it's really nothing bad. Maybe joke around a little bit? If this doesn't work or didn't work--with my mom and dad... they completely don't know what I'm saying and think of it as something bad and when I try to explain or negotiate, they say I'm starting an argument...--then I think that maybe you should dump him. With my mom and dad, that's at least what I did... I ended up really... hating... them... Oh btw, the silent treatment or saying that you don't want to start an argument probably wouldn't help. One thing, ignoring someone in my opinion isn't exactly helping because you're not solving the problem or dealing with it, you're just trying to avoid it, and in life, that always comes back to stab me later. like he'll probably start it more intensely next time. It's better to just try to deal with it a nice way. And in my experience, saying that you don't want to start an argument may initiate them into saying that I am or that they don't want to too, but I am just arguing. It also depends on your tone in an argument. Just try to stay calm and don't let him get to you. I've never actually exploded before so to say, I just kept on defending until we just stop or I hang up if it's on the phone.

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