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Romeo & Juliet Act 1 Summary Help?

Romeo & Juliet Act 1 Summary Help? Topic: How to write a critical summary
July 17, 2019 / By Bashemath
Question: My English assignment is to write a summary about Romeo and Juliet Act 1. It has to have these words in it; alligator, auspicious, castigate, critical, dauntless, divest, equivocal, eyeball, eyesore, frugal, gloomy, gnarled, hoodwinked, impede, jaded, laughingstock, leapfrog, lonely. & i can't write it because i don't know what to write b/c these words have nothing to do with Romeo & Juliet. It's just words from this handout that said that these are some of the words that Shakesphere is credited for. It has to be at least a paragraph long. Pleasee help me !! Best Answer = 10pts !! Thankss !! :) I don't need an entire paragraph. I just need some sentences & ideas & stuff that will help me to write a paragraph. :) I don't need an entire paragraph. I just need some sentences & ideas & stuff that will help me to write a paragraph. :)
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Best Answers: Romeo & Juliet Act 1 Summary Help?

Adelice Adelice | 9 days ago
I'm not going to write your paragraph, but maybe I can help you to see how you can use these words. Alligator...this one loses me. I'd have to read the play again, and I don't have it here, or have the time to do that. There are reptiles called that, and clamps called alligator, maybe a person's wrinkled skin could be called alligator. There are some uses in metalworking, maybe something on a sword or shield? Auspicious...favorable, opportune, propitious. An auspicious occassion would be a favorable occassion...like bumping into someone you've been wanting to see. Castigate, criticize or scold. Like people who didn't want them to get together told them it wasn't a good match. Think Thiebault and Juliet's parents. Critical...you know what this means. When was the nurse critical of Juliette? Dauntless...fearless, brave, not intimigated, bold...describes most of the young men in the play. Divest...get rid of, throw away, eliminate, strip. Possibly divest yourself of a romance? Or of a prejudice? Equivocal...doubtful, unsure, ambiguous. Eyeball...you know what an eyeball is. It can also be used as a slang phrase, meaning looking at something. A guy might eyeball a girl he finds attractive. Eyesore...something ugly, that makes your eyes hurt. Frugal...thrifty, conservative, cheap Gloomy...sad, dark, not happy, depressed. Gnarled...crabby, cantankerous, weathered Hoodwinked...tricked. This one should be easy. How was trickery used in the plot. Impede...interfere, get in the way...impede the path tolove? Jaded...overused, worn out, satiated Laughingstock...the butt of the joke, the guy being ridiculed. Leapfrog...jump over something, not necessarily a game where you jump over somebody whose hunched down, but maybe you skipped a grade in school and leapfrogged over 4th grade, or went to the head of the class...jumped over all the other students to become first in something. Lonely...all over the place. Romeo kills himself when he thinks Juliette is dead because he's lonely. The nurse will be lonely when Juliette goes off with Romeo. Romeo's friends will be lonely if he gets married. The friar is lonely, living the single life of a monk. Good luck.
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Adelice Originally Answered: Romeo & Juliet Act 1 Summary Help?
I'm not going to write your paragraph, but maybe I can help you to see how you can use these words. Alligator...this one loses me. I'd have to read the play again, and I don't have it here, or have the time to do that. There are reptiles called that, and clamps called alligator, maybe a person's wrinkled skin could be called alligator. There are some uses in metalworking, maybe something on a sword or shield? Auspicious...favorable, opportune, propitious. An auspicious occassion would be a favorable occassion...like bumping into someone you've been wanting to see. Castigate, criticize or scold. Like people who didn't want them to get together told them it wasn't a good match. Think Thiebault and Juliet's parents. Critical...you know what this means. When was the nurse critical of Juliette? Dauntless...fearless, brave, not intimigated, bold...describes most of the young men in the play. Divest...get rid of, throw away, eliminate, strip. Possibly divest yourself of a romance? Or of a prejudice? Equivocal...doubtful, unsure, ambiguous. Eyeball...you know what an eyeball is. It can also be used as a slang phrase, meaning looking at something. A guy might eyeball a girl he finds attractive. Eyesore...something ugly, that makes your eyes hurt. Frugal...thrifty, conservative, cheap Gloomy...sad, dark, not happy, depressed. Gnarled...crabby, cantankerous, weathered Hoodwinked...tricked. This one should be easy. How was trickery used in the plot. Impede...interfere, get in the way...impede the path tolove? Jaded...overused, worn out, satiated Laughingstock...the butt of the joke, the guy being ridiculed. Leapfrog...jump over something, not necessarily a game where you jump over somebody whose hunched down, but maybe you skipped a grade in school and leapfrogged over 4th grade, or went to the head of the class...jumped over all the other students to become first in something. Lonely...all over the place. Romeo kills himself when he thinks Juliette is dead because he's lonely. The nurse will be lonely when Juliette goes off with Romeo. Romeo's friends will be lonely if he gets married. The friar is lonely, living the single life of a monk. Good luck.
Adelice Originally Answered: Romeo & Juliet Act 1 Summary Help?
You can use most of them in similes and metaphors. For example, you can compare an angry Tybalt to the alligator because they're both dangerous. I think the best way would be to find out all the possible definitions for each word, and see if there's a certain situation or character that you could apply them to in any way.

Teagan Teagan
You can use most of them in similes and metaphors. For example, you can compare an angry Tybalt to the alligator because they're both dangerous. I think the best way would be to find out all the possible definitions for each word, and see if there's a certain situation or character that you could apply them to in any way.
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Teagan Originally Answered: I have a paper on Romeo and Juliet that I need to right, and if someone could proofread it, that would be good?
A solid essay. Make sure to include the contrast between the themes love and hate, two opposites, in Romeo and Juliet. From Shmoop

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