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I am a black female and i want to be a bone marrow donor i say black cause in some cases it make a difference?

I am a black female and i want to be a bone marrow donor i say black cause in some cases it make a difference? Topic: Cause in fact case search
June 15, 2019 / By Felis
Question: what can i expect in gettin this done do i just go to a hospital and say i wanna be a donor or go to my dr?
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Best Answers: I am a black female and i want to be a bone marrow donor i say black cause in some cases it make a difference?

Cy Cy | 9 days ago
You would sign up for the marrow registry. If you are in the US, its http://www.marrow.org . If you are in a different country, just search for your country's marrow program. In the UK its the Anthony Nolan Trust, but I dont know the web address off the top of my head. Canada may have its own page, but is together with the US registry. Race does matter in the matching process, because the matching process is essentially a type of dna testing. Since you are a minority, its great that you want to sign up because the registry needs as many people from as many different ehtnicities as possible. You can sign up in person if there is a donor center in your area, or by mail. In the US, it costs 50$ to sign up. That fee is to help offset the costs of typing, which is like several hundred dollars and in the US its a publically funded program. Sometimes there are programs or donor drives that can sign you up for free, you can call the registry to ask if there are any in your area. When you sign up, they will take either a small sample of blood or a cheeck swab to type you, and then log your info into the registry. Your info will be searchable world wide, although you remain anonymous. If you are selected as a possible donor, the registry will contact you and set you up with a local hospital to get additional testing to make sure you are still healthy enough and that you are in fact a match. You can decline from donating at any time, and pull your name from the registry at any time. There are two different ways the donation is done, and the site I listed up there breifly gives an over view of them.
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Cy Originally Answered: I am a black female and i want to be a bone marrow donor i say black cause in some cases it make a difference?
You would sign up for the marrow registry. If you are in the US, its http://www.marrow.org . If you are in a different country, just search for your country's marrow program. In the UK its the Anthony Nolan Trust, but I dont know the web address off the top of my head. Canada may have its own page, but is together with the US registry. Race does matter in the matching process, because the matching process is essentially a type of dna testing. Since you are a minority, its great that you want to sign up because the registry needs as many people from as many different ehtnicities as possible. You can sign up in person if there is a donor center in your area, or by mail. In the US, it costs 50$ to sign up. That fee is to help offset the costs of typing, which is like several hundred dollars and in the US its a publically funded program. Sometimes there are programs or donor drives that can sign you up for free, you can call the registry to ask if there are any in your area. When you sign up, they will take either a small sample of blood or a cheeck swab to type you, and then log your info into the registry. Your info will be searchable world wide, although you remain anonymous. If you are selected as a possible donor, the registry will contact you and set you up with a local hospital to get additional testing to make sure you are still healthy enough and that you are in fact a match. You can decline from donating at any time, and pull your name from the registry at any time. There are two different ways the donation is done, and the site I listed up there breifly gives an over view of them.
Cy Originally Answered: I am a black female and i want to be a bone marrow donor i say black cause in some cases it make a difference?
I don't think race makes a difference. Yes, your doctor is a good place to start. At the very least, he/she can send you to the right people to start the testing. Good for you!

Aubrey Aubrey
I don't think race makes a difference. Yes, your doctor is a good place to start. At the very least, he/she can send you to the right people to start the testing. Good for you!
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Aubrey Originally Answered: Questions on getting paid for donating bone marrow in NYC?
It is illegal to sell bone marrow for a transplant. There may be facilities that are looking for marrow to do research, but the chances of them paying over and beyond the medical costs of the donation is slim - harvesting marrow (or peripheral blood stem cells) is EXPENSIVE. There are people doing it on a black market, but the whole thing has to be very hush hush - doctors won't do it if they know the donor is getting paid, they can loose their license for allowing it to happen. Consider this.. 1. It actually is not that painful. If actual bone marrow is taken, they do it under general anesthesia. You will be sore for a couple weeks, but it will not interfere with your normal routine. But, most "marrow" donations today are actually peripheral blood stem cell donations. What makes the transplant work is the stem cells in the bone marrow, and the same type of stem cells are found in the circulating blood. It is done the same way a double red cell donation is done at the red cross, but takes a little bit longer 2. A bone marrow transplant, once ALL costs are factored in, can cost upwards of a million dollars, if paying out of pocket. That is why you see so many people fund raising for leukemia treatment. Now imagine if, on top of all the other costs, you had to pay someone for the bone marrow too? If it was legal to sell bone marrow, I imagine the prices would be much higher than what you have quoted. As for the other questions.. Yes, the registry compiles possible donors, and then waits for a patient who is a genetic match. I do not know the exact numbers, but the odds of donating are much lower than what you quoted, somewhere closer to 1 in 20,000. The bone marrow transplant can treat something like 200 different diseases. Out of all the people that need the transplant, over 2/3s of them do not have a matched donor. People are dying because of the misconceptions, or greed, of possible donors who will not sign up for the registry. I read a study that estimated that the number of those without a donor would drop to 1/4 or lower, if most people were on the registry. As it stands now, less than 20% of the population is registered to donate.
Aubrey Originally Answered: Questions on getting paid for donating bone marrow in NYC?
Black market would be the only place. It is illegal to pay for marrow for donation. And harvesting marrow is so expensive that most research facilities are not going to be willing to pay the donor above and beyond the medical cost of harvesting.

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