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Where did this name originate?

Where did this name originate? Topic: Circa research
June 25, 2019 / By Sable
Question: I met someone with the last name Ames and looked it up.... Almost all of the sites said it is a Norman name that developed in England after the Norman conquest. A lot of places say this name has Scandinavian origins but im not sure. Any help?
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Best Answers: Where did this name originate?

Nessie Nessie | 1 day ago
Ames Name Meaning and History 1.English: from the Old French and Middle English personal name Amys, Amice, which is either directly from Latin amicus ‘friend’, used as a personal name, or via a Late Latin derivative of this, Amicius. 2.German: of uncertain origin. Perhaps a nickname for an active person, from a Germanic word related to Old High German amazzig ‘busy’. Compare modern German Ameise ‘ant’. Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4 http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Ames-famil... Ames Surname This interesting and long-established surname is of medieval English origin, and derives from the Old French given name (or nickname) "Amis", the oblique case of "Ami", Friend, ultimately from the Latin "amicus", a derivative of "amare", to love. The name was introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066, and the forms "Amicia" (feminine) and "Amisius" (masculine) are recorded respectively in Documents relating to the Danelaw, Lincolnshire, dated 1189, and in the Curia Regis Rolls of Hertfordshire, dated 1211. One Rogerus filius (son of) Ami was noted in the Chartulary of Ramsey Abbey, Norfolk, circa 1250, and a Robert Amys appears in the 1273 Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire. On January 18th 1573, William, son of Richard Ames, was christened in Dunstable, Bedfordshire. Notable bearers of the name were William Ames (1576 - 1633), the Arminian minister at Rotterdam in 1613, and professor of theology, Franeker (1622), and Joseph Ames (1689 - 1759), bibliographer and antiquary, who became a fellow of the Royal Society in 1743. On May 11th 1637, Joane Ames, of Yarmouth, a widow, aged 50 yrs., with her three children Ruth, William and John, were listed in a register of those "desirous to passe for New England and there to inhabit and remain". The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert Amis, which was dated 1221, in "Medieval Records of Suffolk", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. © Copyright: Name Origin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2010 Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/surname.aspx?na... Surname Ames The ancient name Ames is a Norman name that would have been developed in England after the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. The name was a name given to a good friend or beloved one. The name was originally derived from the Old French given name or nickname Amis or Ami, which means friend. Before the last few hundred years the English language had no fixed system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations occurred commonly in Anglo Norman surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Ames were recorded, including Ames, Amess, Amies, Amis, Amiss, Amos, Hames, Haymes, Eames Emmes and many more. First found in the county of Northumberland, where they were granted ands by King William after the Norman Conquest of 1066. They originated from Exmes, a town in the department of Orne, in Normandy. http://www.houseofnames.com/fc.asp?sId=&... Ames Surname This surname AMES is a baptismal name 'the son of Amys' which was derived from the Old French name Aimee. The name was brought to England with the Norman Conqueror in 1066. Many of the early names recorded in medieval documents denote noble families but many also indicate migration from the continent during, and in the wake of, the Norman invasion of 1066. There was a constant stream of merchants, workmen and others arriving in England during this time. In 1086 the Record of Great Inquisition of lands of England, their extent, value, ownership and liabilities was made by order of William The Conqueror. It is known as the Domesday book. Early records of the name mention William filius Amyes, 1273 County Lincolnshire. Amis de Selves of County Kent, was documented during the reign of Edward I (1272-1307). Gregory Amys, registered at Oxford University in the year of 1525. Baptized. Daniel, son of George Aymes, St. Michael, Cornhill, London in 1603. Between the 11th and 15th centuries it became customary for surnames to be assumed in Europe, but they were not commonplace in England or Scotland before the Norman Conquest of 1066. They are to be found in the Domesday Book of 1086. Those of gentler blood assumed surnames at this time, but it was not until the reign of Edward II (1327-1377) that it became common practice for all people. At first the coat of arms was a practical matter which served a function on the battlefield and in tournaments. With his helmet covering his face, and armor encasing the knight from head to foot, the only means of identification for his followers, was the insignia painted on his shield, and embroidered on his surcoat, the draped and flowing garment worn over the armor. In many parts of central and western Europe, hereditary surnames began to become fixed at around the 12th century, and have developed and changed slowly over the years. As society became more complex, and such matters as the management of tenure, and in particular the collection of taxes were delegated to special functionaries, it became imperative to distinguish a more complex system of nomenclature to differentiate one individual from another. http://www.4crests.com/ames-coat-of-arms.html The name is Norman or more appropriately Anglo-Norman and it did in fact develop in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name means good friend or beloved one and is believed to have originated from Exmes, a town in the department of Orne, in Normandy. I can find no reference to any Scandinavian origins. However, just for the record, the only way for your friend to be certain of the origin of their Ames surname is to research their ancestors and learn their origin; there is no substitute for good old fashion research, sorry.
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Nessie Originally Answered: Where did this name originate?
Ames Name Meaning and History 1.English: from the Old French and Middle English personal name Amys, Amice, which is either directly from Latin amicus ‘friend’, used as a personal name, or via a Late Latin derivative of this, Amicius. 2.German: of uncertain origin. Perhaps a nickname for an active person, from a Germanic word related to Old High German amazzig ‘busy’. Compare modern German Ameise ‘ant’. Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4 http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Ames-famil... Ames Surname This interesting and long-established surname is of medieval English origin, and derives from the Old French given name (or nickname) "Amis", the oblique case of "Ami", Friend, ultimately from the Latin "amicus", a derivative of "amare", to love. The name was introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066, and the forms "Amicia" (feminine) and "Amisius" (masculine) are recorded respectively in Documents relating to the Danelaw, Lincolnshire, dated 1189, and in the Curia Regis Rolls of Hertfordshire, dated 1211. One Rogerus filius (son of) Ami was noted in the Chartulary of Ramsey Abbey, Norfolk, circa 1250, and a Robert Amys appears in the 1273 Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire. On January 18th 1573, William, son of Richard Ames, was christened in Dunstable, Bedfordshire. Notable bearers of the name were William Ames (1576 - 1633), the Arminian minister at Rotterdam in 1613, and professor of theology, Franeker (1622), and Joseph Ames (1689 - 1759), bibliographer and antiquary, who became a fellow of the Royal Society in 1743. On May 11th 1637, Joane Ames, of Yarmouth, a widow, aged 50 yrs., with her three children Ruth, William and John, were listed in a register of those "desirous to passe for New England and there to inhabit and remain". The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert Amis, which was dated 1221, in "Medieval Records of Suffolk", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. © Copyright: Name Origin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2010 Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/surname.aspx?na... Surname Ames The ancient name Ames is a Norman name that would have been developed in England after the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. The name was a name given to a good friend or beloved one. The name was originally derived from the Old French given name or nickname Amis or Ami, which means friend. Before the last few hundred years the English language had no fixed system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations occurred commonly in Anglo Norman surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Ames were recorded, including Ames, Amess, Amies, Amis, Amiss, Amos, Hames, Haymes, Eames Emmes and many more. First found in the county of Northumberland, where they were granted ands by King William after the Norman Conquest of 1066. They originated from Exmes, a town in the department of Orne, in Normandy. http://www.houseofnames.com/fc.asp?sId=&... Ames Surname This surname AMES is a baptismal name 'the son of Amys' which was derived from the Old French name Aimee. The name was brought to England with the Norman Conqueror in 1066. Many of the early names recorded in medieval documents denote noble families but many also indicate migration from the continent during, and in the wake of, the Norman invasion of 1066. There was a constant stream of merchants, workmen and others arriving in England during this time. In 1086 the Record of Great Inquisition of lands of England, their extent, value, ownership and liabilities was made by order of William The Conqueror. It is known as the Domesday book. Early records of the name mention William filius Amyes, 1273 County Lincolnshire. Amis de Selves of County Kent, was documented during the reign of Edward I (1272-1307). Gregory Amys, registered at Oxford University in the year of 1525. Baptized. Daniel, son of George Aymes, St. Michael, Cornhill, London in 1603. Between the 11th and 15th centuries it became customary for surnames to be assumed in Europe, but they were not commonplace in England or Scotland before the Norman Conquest of 1066. They are to be found in the Domesday Book of 1086. Those of gentler blood assumed surnames at this time, but it was not until the reign of Edward II (1327-1377) that it became common practice for all people. At first the coat of arms was a practical matter which served a function on the battlefield and in tournaments. With his helmet covering his face, and armor encasing the knight from head to foot, the only means of identification for his followers, was the insignia painted on his shield, and embroidered on his surcoat, the draped and flowing garment worn over the armor. In many parts of central and western Europe, hereditary surnames began to become fixed at around the 12th century, and have developed and changed slowly over the years. As society became more complex, and such matters as the management of tenure, and in particular the collection of taxes were delegated to special functionaries, it became imperative to distinguish a more complex system of nomenclature to differentiate one individual from another. http://www.4crests.com/ames-coat-of-arms.html The name is Norman or more appropriately Anglo-Norman and it did in fact develop in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name means good friend or beloved one and is believed to have originated from Exmes, a town in the department of Orne, in Normandy. I can find no reference to any Scandinavian origins. However, just for the record, the only way for your friend to be certain of the origin of their Ames surname is to research their ancestors and learn their origin; there is no substitute for good old fashion research, sorry.
Nessie Originally Answered: Where did this name originate?
Ames Name Meaning and History 1) English: from the Old French and Middle English personal name Amys, Amice, which is either directly from Latin amicus ‘friend’, used as a personal name, or via a Late Latin derivative of this, Amicius. 2) German: of uncertain origin. Perhaps a nickname for an active person, from a Germanic word related to Old High German amazzig ‘busy’. Compare modern German Ameise ‘ant’. Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4 via http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Ames-famil...

Lucy Lucy
Ames Name Meaning and History 1) English: from the Old French and Middle English personal name Amys, Amice, which is either directly from Latin amicus ‘friend’, used as a personal name, or via a Late Latin derivative of this, Amicius. 2) German: of uncertain origin. Perhaps a nickname for an active person, from a Germanic word related to Old High German amazzig ‘busy’. Compare modern German Ameise ‘ant’. Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4 via http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Ames-famil...
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Lucy Originally Answered: Where did this name originate?
Ames Name Meaning and History 1.English: from the Old French and Middle English personal name Amys, Amice, which is either directly from Latin amicus ‘friend’, used as a personal name, or via a Late Latin derivative of this, Amicius. 2.German: of uncertain origin. Perhaps a nickname for an active person, from a Germanic word related to Old High German amazzig ‘busy’. Compare modern German Ameise ‘ant’. Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4 http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Ames-famil... Ames Surname This interesting and long-established surname is of medieval English origin, and derives from the Old French given name (or nickname) "Amis", the oblique case of "Ami", Friend, ultimately from the Latin "amicus", a derivative of "amare", to love. The name was introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066, and the forms "Amicia" (feminine) and "Amisius" (masculine) are recorded respectively in Documents relating to the Danelaw, Lincolnshire, dated 1189, and in the Curia Regis Rolls of Hertfordshire, dated 1211. One Rogerus filius (son of) Ami was noted in the Chartulary of Ramsey Abbey, Norfolk, circa 1250, and a Robert Amys appears in the 1273 Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire. On January 18th 1573, William, son of Richard Ames, was christened in Dunstable, Bedfordshire. Notable bearers of the name were William Ames (1576 - 1633), the Arminian minister at Rotterdam in 1613, and professor of theology, Franeker (1622), and Joseph Ames (1689 - 1759), bibliographer and antiquary, who became a fellow of the Royal Society in 1743. On May 11th 1637, Joane Ames, of Yarmouth, a widow, aged 50 yrs., with her three children Ruth, William and John, were listed in a register of those "desirous to passe for New England and there to inhabit and remain". The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert Amis, which was dated 1221, in "Medieval Records of Suffolk", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. © Copyright: Name Origin Research www.surnamedb.com 1980 - 2010 Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/surname.aspx?na... Surname Ames The ancient name Ames is a Norman name that would have been developed in England after the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. The name was a name given to a good friend or beloved one. The name was originally derived from the Old French given name or nickname Amis or Ami, which means friend. Before the last few hundred years the English language had no fixed system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations occurred commonly in Anglo Norman surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name Ames were recorded, including Ames, Amess, Amies, Amis, Amiss, Amos, Hames, Haymes, Eames Emmes and many more. First found in the county of Northumberland, where they were granted ands by King William after the Norman Conquest of 1066. They originated from Exmes, a town in the department of Orne, in Normandy. http://www.houseofnames.com/fc.asp?sId=&... Ames Surname This surname AMES is a baptismal name 'the son of Amys' which was derived from the Old French name Aimee. The name was brought to England with the Norman Conqueror in 1066. Many of the early names recorded in medieval documents denote noble families but many also indicate migration from the continent during, and in the wake of, the Norman invasion of 1066. There was a constant stream of merchants, workmen and others arriving in England during this time. In 1086 the Record of Great Inquisition of lands of England, their extent, value, ownership and liabilities was made by order of William The Conqueror. It is known as the Domesday book. Early records of the name mention William filius Amyes, 1273 County Lincolnshire. Amis de Selves of County Kent, was documented during the reign of Edward I (1272-1307). Gregory Amys, registered at Oxford University in the year of 1525. Baptized. Daniel, son of George Aymes, St. Michael, Cornhill, London in 1603. Between the 11th and 15th centuries it became customary for surnames to be assumed in Europe, but they were not commonplace in England or Scotland before the Norman Conquest of 1066. They are to be found in the Domesday Book of 1086. Those of gentler blood assumed surnames at this time, but it was not until the reign of Edward II (1327-1377) that it became common practice for all people. At first the coat of arms was a practical matter which served a function on the battlefield and in tournaments. With his helmet covering his face, and armor encasing the knight from head to foot, the only means of identification for his followers, was the insignia painted on his shield, and embroidered on his surcoat, the draped and flowing garment worn over the armor. In many parts of central and western Europe, hereditary surnames began to become fixed at around the 12th century, and have developed and changed slowly over the years. As society became more complex, and such matters as the management of tenure, and in particular the collection of taxes were delegated to special functionaries, it became imperative to distinguish a more complex system of nomenclature to differentiate one individual from another. http://www.4crests.com/ames-coat-of-arms.html The name is Norman or more appropriately Anglo-Norman and it did in fact develop in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name means good friend or beloved one and is believed to have originated from Exmes, a town in the department of Orne, in Normandy. I can find no reference to any Scandinavian origins. However, just for the record, the only way for your friend to be certain of the origin of their Ames surname is to research their ancestors and learn their origin; there is no substitute for good old fashion research, sorry.
Lucy Originally Answered: Where did this name originate?
Ames Name Meaning and History 1) English: from the Old French and Middle English personal name Amys, Amice, which is either directly from Latin amicus ‘friend’, used as a personal name, or via a Late Latin derivative of this, Amicius. 2) German: of uncertain origin. Perhaps a nickname for an active person, from a Germanic word related to Old High German amazzig ‘busy’. Compare modern German Ameise ‘ant’. Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4 via http://www.ancestry.com/facts/Ames-famil...

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