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Does ALS Typically Disproportionally Spare the Cranial Nerves?

Does ALS Typically Disproportionally Spare the Cranial Nerves? Topic: Parenthesis in html
June 20, 2019 / By Aden
Question: Thanks RM, So One Could Expect Dysarthria (Sp?), Dysphagia and Other GI Problems? Thanks K, I Suspect Bell's and ALS Might Be Related to a Herpesvirus Infection. BTW, ALS, Not "ALS-Like", Which I Suspect With me. K, a Picornavirus, of Which Poliovirus is One: http://www.virology.net/Big_Virology/BVRNApicorna.html Not a Herpesvirus. K, No Biggie Man.
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Steffie Steffie | 2 days ago
Of interest: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/91038... EDIT: Well, there is evidence to support those contentions. It seems the link between herpesviruses and Bell's Palsy is more established than the link between herpesviruses and ALS. The latter appears to be in its' infancy, but it seems that research is headed that way. Latest and only one example of a link between Bell's Palsy and HSV-1: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18051... HSV-1 and ALS (also poliovirus): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25605... HHV-8 and ALS: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15319099?ordinalpos=3&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum EDIT 2: Oh, cool. I like to see pics of viruses. I'd be a keener in any virology class...with unlimited access to microscopes and slides. Definitely. Anyway, so, in the family of Picornaviridae. I just mentioned it in the parentheses, above, because the abstract mentioned it alongside HSV-1. I DID know that the poliovirus was not a herpesvirus. Gimmie *some* credit, man. *Sheesh*. LOL ;-).
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Steffie Originally Answered: Does ALS Typically Disproportionally Spare the Cranial Nerves?
Of interest: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/91038... EDIT: Well, there is evidence to support those contentions. It seems the link between herpesviruses and Bell's Palsy is more established than the link between herpesviruses and ALS. The latter appears to be in its' infancy, but it seems that research is headed that way. Latest and only one example of a link between Bell's Palsy and HSV-1: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18051... HSV-1 and ALS (also poliovirus): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25605... HHV-8 and ALS: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15319099?ordinalpos=3&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum EDIT 2: Oh, cool. I like to see pics of viruses. I'd be a keener in any virology class...with unlimited access to microscopes and slides. Definitely. Anyway, so, in the family of Picornaviridae. I just mentioned it in the parentheses, above, because the abstract mentioned it alongside HSV-1. I DID know that the poliovirus was not a herpesvirus. Gimmie *some* credit, man. *Sheesh*. LOL ;-).
Steffie Originally Answered: Does ALS Typically Disproportionally Spare the Cranial Nerves?
Not particularly. Tongue (CN XII) and pharyngeal muscles (CN X) are commonly affected. Extraocular muscles tend to be spared. Other CNs with voluntary musculature may be affected. Edit: Yes, dysarthria and dysphagia are big problems with ALS. You can roughly categorize patients into ones with a CN-onset where these factors are prominent and into a more limb-onset where the CN involvement is lesser. While the differentiation is not always black and white, those with the more CN-onset tend to have a significantly more rapid disease progression. Other GI problems tend to be related to the pharyngeal weakness but, assuming survival, essentially all ALS patients will be faced with the choice of whether they want a feeding tube placed.

Quanna Quanna
Not particularly. Tongue (CN XII) and pharyngeal muscles (CN X) are commonly affected. Extraocular muscles tend to be spared. Other CNs with voluntary musculature may be affected. Edit: Yes, dysarthria and dysphagia are big problems with ALS. You can roughly categorize patients into ones with a CN-onset where these factors are prominent and into a more limb-onset where the CN involvement is lesser. While the differentiation is not always black and white, those with the more CN-onset tend to have a significantly more rapid disease progression. Other GI problems tend to be related to the pharyngeal weakness but, assuming survival, essentially all ALS patients will be faced with the choice of whether they want a feeding tube placed.
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Quanna Originally Answered: Where are swamps typically found?
Prairie grasslands do have wet localities with potholes or marshes. They form in old glacier basins scoured out in the ice ages. Glaciers leaves dams of soil then retreat. Water carries soil & silt in to fill in the dammed basin. Most marshes are about 1 acre or less in area in the South Dakota, Minnesota, Saskatchewan and Alberta Prairies. In all there is some 780.000 sq K of interspersed marshes and prairie. Migratory birds rely on the presence of these water sources along their routes and as breeding grounds. It is thought some 75% of waterfowl rely on prairie wetlands: mallard, canvasback, lesser scaup, pintail, grebe, rail, killdeer, godwit, black tern, marsh wren, various types of blackbird and savannah sparrow can be found. Beaver, mice, shrews, mink, weasels, foxes, coyotes, and deer will live there or use then as water sources. Cattails, bulrush, sedges, and arrowhead are emergent water plants that grow rooted in the water logged soil. Floating and submerged plants include water lilies, watermeal and wild rice. http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/plant... http://www.cedarcreek.umn.edu/conservati... The Nature Conservancy has bought Altamont Prairie site with a 3 acre marsh for preservation and research http://www.nature.org/wherewework/northa... Restoring prairie wetlands http://books.google.com/books?id=tVbHsfy4NHAC&pg=PA19&lpg=PA19&dq=prairie+wetland+animals++marsh+plants&source=bl&ots=puaoGkvoT1&sig=TN_4zn_cXO2LRsup0zeIE_ZFZWQ&hl=en&ei=G5x0SrudKIbQsQO0ioHvCA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1#v=onepage&q=prairie%20wetland%20animals%20%20marsh%20plants&f=false Other areas rich in grassland and swamps includes Florida. These are a very different water system than prairie grasslands. Florida grasslands have a larger number of invertebrate primary consumers of plant life that the American prairie or African savannah. Florida grasslands can support more small carnivores that live on insects and other invertebrates as a result. The largest carnivore in the Florida grassland ecosystem is the native panther (Felis concolor coryi). http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/7200/the_florida_panther_understanding_and.html?cat=48 http://books.google.com/books?id=Suw8AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA594&lpg=PA594&dq=florida+grasslands&source=bl&ots=-t_5Kf88es&sig=UrRXJ8w287TtzjpjHzQs35q22tQ&hl=en&ei=a5x0SoCEMIecsgP_jrTqCA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=7#v=onepage&q=florida%20grasslands&f=false http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090602204255.htm
Quanna Originally Answered: Where are swamps typically found?
they can be found in an area that was once an estuary but years of deposition closed off acess to the sea for the river so the bay flooded and the area became a swamp or marsh, it can also be found near a lake under similar conditions. because the bay contained sand or gravel the soil is poor quality so plants are either simple, like grasses, or carnivourous, like venus flytrap, sundew, bladderwort or pitcher plant. animals that inhabit swamps would be amphibians aquatic and semi-aquatic insects- water beetles, dragonflies, mosquitoes. fish that live there are probably carnivourous like pike or trout. fresh water crabs can live in swamps too. birds that live there include ducks, heron, waterbirds.

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